So much for the old bicycle!

It looks like the bicycles of the future will be rather different from those of today, if two far-out designs make it into production. First we have a design by Olympic cyclist Chris Boardman. The 40-year-old said the technology was already available, it just needed the will to put it all together. The new bike, which would cost around £2,000 [about US $3,232], includes an inbuilt computer system incorporating an ‘unbreakable’ locking device that allows only the owner to open it via fingerprint recognition. A mini computer on the handlebars counts the calories the cyclist is burning by monitoring each

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From war to peace, across 65 years

While we commemorate the beginning and end of World War II, on 1st and 2nd September respectively, there’s an interesting then-and-now exhibition of photographs of Normandy, France. They depict scenes from the invasion, followed by modern photographs of the same scenes today. Here are a couple of examples (I can’t give too many due to copyright restrictions, but a few are OK under ‘fair use’ provisions of the law). A house on Juno Beach, in 1944: and now: The World War 1 Memorial in the Place Foch in the city of Caen, in 1944: and now: The town of Sainte-Mère-Église,

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September 2nd, 1945

Following yesterday’s commemoration of the start of World War II, on September 1st, 1939, with Germany’s invasion of Poland, we immediately move forward in time six years and one day, to Tokyo Bay. On September 2nd, 1945, the representatives of the Empire of Japan signed the instrument of surrender, thereby bringing World War II to a formal close. Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu signs the Instrument of Surrenderon behalf of the Japanese Government, on board USS Missouri (BB-63), 2 September 1945.Lieutenant General Richard K. Sutherland, U.S. Army, watches from the opposite sideof the table. Foreign Ministry representative Toshikazu Kase is

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The truth is spreading . . .

I posted on this blog last week about the ten-billion-dollar handout to trades unions concealed in the health care reform proposals being bandied about in Washington. I’m pleased to see that other news media are beginning to publicize this boondoggle. The Washington Examiner ran a piece about it today. However, most of the mainstream media are remaining deaf, dumb and blind to it. It’s a sickening display of partisanship and abdication of responsibility. One hopes they’ll learn from the Examiner’s example . . . but I won’t hold my breath waiting. Also, Mark Steyn is caustically concise in his coverage

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Dame Vera Lynn

This being the anniversary of the beginning of World War II (see the post below), I spent a while today thinking of my late parents (my mother died a few years ago, and my father in July this year). They met in 1940, married in early 1941, and were immediately separated for three years while Dad went off to fight the war overseas. I’ve written about his service in Weekend Wings #9, so I won’t repeat the story here. Suffice it to say that he had an interesting and sometimes dangerous war, matched by my mother on the home front,

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September 1st, 1939

On this date, seventy years ago, World War II began. According to a BBC report at the time: German forces have invaded Poland and its planes have bombed Polish cities, including the capital, Warsaw. The attack comes without any warning or declaration of war. Britain and France have mobilised their forces and are preparing to wage war on Germany for the second time this century. Just before dawn today, German tanks, infantry and cavalry penetrated Polish territory on several fronts with five armies, a total of 1.5 million troops. Soon afterwards German planes bombarded the cities. They have been making

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