Yes, Blogger had problems last night

Looking at the support forum, hundreds of other Blogger users had the same problems I found last night, which is why others of your favorite blogs might have been light on posting. The Blogger team seems to have fixed the problem, so regular posting should resume tonight. As an aside, it always bugs me how people who use this free – let me repeat that: FREE!!! – blogging software can get so up-in-arms when it hits a snag. It’s not as if we’re paying for it, but some folks seem to get their knickers in a twist and get rude

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The grim cost of war

The Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University has just completed a major study of the real cost of the decade-old War on Terror. They state: Nearly 10 years after the declaration of the War on Terror, the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan have killed at least 225,000 people, including men and women in uniform, contractors, and civilians. The wars will cost Americans between $3.2 and $4 trillion, including medical care and disability for current and future war veterans, according to a new report by the Eisenhower Research Project at the Watson Institute. If these wars continue, they

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Buy one, and get a Doofus award free!

I note with mind-boggled amazement that a company is selling razors for a mere US $100,000 apiece. The manufacturer loftily informs us: Utilizing expertise in fields as varied as rocket engine manufacturing, nanotechnology, and particle physics, the Zafirro Iridium combines some of the rarest, strongest, and most technically advanced materials in existence. The resulting combination of exotic materials pushes the boundaries of technology while creating an aesthetic that could be the centerpiece of a gallery collection. The result of years of R&D, utilizing experts from around the world, our solid white sapphire blades launch a new era of shaving. Hypoallergenic,

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Electronic warfare just got a lot more interesting . . .

Electronic warfare was once something very important to me – as in, first, it was my job, and second, if I did my job well, I could prevent roaming MiGs from getting a fix on where I was and lobbing a few Soviet-made high-explosive calling-cards in my general direction. For some reason, this seemed like a high-value objective to me at the time . . . (Yes, I know, when one’s young, one doesn’t necessarily think strategically!) Anyhoo, I’ve kept up with the field as an interested observer since then; so an announcement from Raytheon the other day caught my

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A new speed record on the TT circuit

The Isle of Man is the location for the world-famous TT motorcycle race each year. It’s held on the Snaefell Mountain Course, 37.733 miles long, which uses public roads, closed for the occasion by an Act of Tynwald, the island’s parliament. It’s the oldest racing course in continuous use in the world. Subaru has released this footage of the 2011 Subaru WRX STI setting a new record over the course. The video description reads: “The 5 minute 25 second video highlights in graphic detail the speed and drama surrounding rally driver Mark Higgins’ lap that averaged 115.356 MPH. After the

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A photographic history of World War II

The Atlantic has just begun publishing a 20-part series of articles on “World War II in Photos“. So far, two articles have been published. The first is “Before The War“. Here are a couple of sample photographs from it, reduced in size to fit this blog. A Japanese soldier stands guard over part of the captured Great Wall of China in 1937,during the Second Sino-Japanese War German-made Stuka dive bombers, part of the Condor Legion,in flight above Spain on May 30, 1939, during the Spanish Civil War The second article is “The Invasion of Poland and the Winter War“. On

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Has the Environmental Protection Agency gone mad?

Via a link at Warren Meyer’s Coyote Blog, we learn of a bizarre EPA regulation that’s costing all of us money at the gas pump . . . for no valid reason whatsoever. We recently posted about the EPA’s decision to reduce the cellulosic ethanol blending requirement from 500 million gallons in 2012 to somewhere between 3.45-12.9 million gallons, which is 0.69- 2.5 percent of the original “mandate.” . . . No companies have to this date been able to produce cellulosic ethanol that qualifies by EPA’s definition. Yet, presumably to save face, the EPA has not lowered the cellulosic

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Breathtaking – literally!

I’m a bit mind-boggled by the ‘balloon art’ of a Canadian model-maker. The Daily Mail reports: Try competing with this balloon artist and you would definitely be wasting your breath. Mark Verge has been perfecting the art form for more than 16 years and has created a 39ft life-size replica of a Tyrannosaurus Rex out of 1,400 balloons. It was just one of the sculptures made by the model-maker along with a triceratops, spinosaurus, stegosaurus and utahraptor for his show in Ontario, Canada. Mr Verge, 43, who is originally from Nova Scotia, first started making balloon animals in 1995 after

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A classic example of mainstream media error

In its latest edition, TIME magazine prints an article by Richard Stengel titled ‘One Document, Under Siege‘. It purports to examine the US constitution . . . but it’s so full of errors that I can’t help but think Mr. Stengel has set out to deliberately deceive his readers. I just don’t see how he can possibly make so many mistakes, and put forward such egregious errors of fact, if he didn’t mean to mislead. Patterico has done a superb job of highlighting Mr. Stengel’s errors. He summarizes them as follows: 13 Objectively false statements in Stengel’s Article on the

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