AR-15 follow-up #2

Earlier this month I appealed for help to readers who were more familiar than I with the AR-15 rifle, and followed it up a week later with a report-back.  This post provides more feedback in terms of what I’ve learned.  In particular, I want to give a shout-out to three companies whose products and/or support have been absolutely outstanding.  They’ve made my life much easier.  (In case you were wondering, I’ve not been asked or paid to mention them.  The same goes for products I name:  some were donated by other shooters, and I paid for the rest out of

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Ferguson around the Web

I put up my own reactions to the Ferguson grand jury verdict earlier today.  There have been a few other very worthwhile articles and blog posts that I’d like to share with you. My buddy Lawdog has some trenchant thoughts on the matter.  A sample: I think that the other old saying about actions having consequences should be followed closely in Ferguson, Missouri. If you are a business owner, and a rampaging mob of Social Justice Warriors has looted and burned your place of business — call your insurance company, take the cheque they’re going to write, and use it

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Just what the world’s been waiting for . . .

I’m afraid this might ruin the old limerick.  The Telegraph reports: A Frenchman has developed a range of pills aimed at making people’s flatulence smell sweeter – of chocolate or of roses – which he says will make the perfect Christmas present. The 65-year-old artist and inventor says his pills are aimed at easing indigestion and are made of 100 percent natural ingredients such as fennel, seaweed and blueberries. The pills are sold on the internet under the Lutin Malin (Crafty Imp) website pilulepet.com and have been approved by health authorities, according to Christian Poincheval, who is based in the

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The Ferguson verdict

Well, the verdict’s out at last.  Officer Darren Wilson will not face criminal charges in connection with the shooting of Michael Brown in August.  I’m not surprised;  for weeks, it’s been clear that the balance of evidence was that it was a justifiable homicide. It’s also been clear for weeks – ever since the shooting, in fact – that protesters could not be trusted to demonstrate peacefully their opposition to the racial tensions in Ferguson, MO, and the events that led to Michael Brown’s death.  Predictably, many of them were not interested in the facts of the matter, only in

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Crimson Trace laser sights

I was asked today why, in previous articles, I’ve recommended Crimson Trace laser sights for pistols over all other brands.  My correspondent pointed out: Most other laser sights are half the price of the Crimson Trace equivalent, and work just as well.  Why should I pay double for the CT version? I admitted that he was quite correct about the pricing:  but cost isn’t everything.  I thought some of you might like to hear my explanation. Let me begin by emphasizing that I don’t earn anything for recommending Crimson Trace – no endorsement fees, no free products, nothing like that. 

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Medical costs and US government spending

Karl Denninger has produced this video presentation that lays it on the line about how medical costs are crippling the US economy and our government’s budget.  He hasn’t made up a thing – he uses official US government figures.  You need to watch this, carefully. Makes you think, doesn’t it? Of course, there’s the question of how to do it.  Our current crop of politicians won’t – they’ve been bought and paid for by corporate lobbyists.  Just look at the top ten business sectors in terms of how much they spent on lobbying in the 2014 fiscal year.  Four out

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I thought this was faked, but it’s real

I was astonished to learn an advertisement that I was sure was CGI was, in fact, real.  The Telegraph reports: The video was created as an advert for EMC technology, who are technology partners for Lotus F1 team. The Lotus team are now in possession of an impressive new world record as the F1 transporter managed to clear the longest ever truck jump at 83 feet and seven inches. There’s more at the link. Here’s the advertisement. I’d love to know how they prepared that truck for the attempt – clearly, it must have been stripped of every possible ounce

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A great (and free) literary resource

Courtesy of a link at Instapundit, I was led to an article in Open Culture that described the Harvard Classics series. It was in 1909 … before the advent of modernism and world war, that The Harvard Classics took shape. Compiled by Harvard’s president Charles W. Eliot and called at first Dr. Eliot’s Five Foot Shelf, the compendium of literature, philosophy, and the sciences, writes Adam Kirsch in Harvard Magazine, served as a “monument from a more humane and confident time” (or so its upper classes believed), and a “time capsule…. In 50 volumes.” What does the massive collection preserve?

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Saturday Night Live gets it said

I know many bloggers have already embedded this, but it’s so accurate I think I’ll join them.  Saturday Night Live skewered President Obama’s ‘imperial’ proclamation of concessions to illegal aliens in a very well-done sketch. I doubt whether President Obama will give a damn, though . . . Peter

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The horror of surgery before anesthetics

Through a link in an article at Taki’s Magazine, I came across Fanny Burney‘s description of her mastectomy in 1811.  It’s horrifyingly graphic in its details, and conveys the agony of surgery without anesthetic better than anything else I’ve ever read.  Here’s one paragraph from her account. … when the dreadful steel was plunged into the breast—cutting through veins—arteries—flesh—nerves—I needed no injunctions not to restrain my cries. I began a scream that lasted unintermittingly during the whole time of the incision—and I almost marvel that it rings not in my Ears still! so excruciating was the agony. When the wound

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