He might want to rethink this idea . . .

I note with interest that the Sergeant-Major of the Army (the most senior NCO in the US Army) is considering letting soldiers offer suggestions concerning a point of some . . . sensitivity. When the Army reversed its much-hated tattoo policy, many cheered Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey, who was a driving force behind the decision. “Soldiers show me their new tattoos now,” Dailey told Army Times. But Dailey, who became the Army’s top senior enlisted soldier on Jan. 30, doesn’t have any ink of his own — for now. Your SMA has recently given some serious thought

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A different perspective on the Confederate battle flag

I shared my thoughts concerning the Confederate battle flag a few days ago.  They didn’t sit well with all of my readers (not surprisingly, given the controversial nature of the topic at present).  One reader, Sandy, sent me the link to an interesting article in the American Spectator.  Here’s an excerpt. I submit that for many today, the Confederate flag is a statement of regional defiance, not against the abolitionist movement, but against what we might call Northernism, as manifested among cultural elites in the Northeast Corridor, the Beltway, Chicago, and the Left Coast. Though Southerners hear that they aren’t

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Doofus Of The Day #840

A tip o’ the hat to Australian reader Snoggeramus for forwarding the link to today’s winner – a (presumably) successful businessman and (clearly less successful) gardener in New Zealand. Businessman Paul Currie was in a hurry. He was at his holiday home in Rata St, Wanaka, about to head home to Christchurch. The new lawn was looking great, he thought. Just those broadleafs. Perhaps he should give them a quick spray before he left. That was a month ago. Then the phone calls started – from neighbours who wondered if the brown marks appearing in his green lawn might have

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Brad Torgersen nails the gay marriage issue

Author Brad Torgersen absolutely nails the gay marriage issue in his latest blog post.  Here’s an excerpt. If the base fear of religious conservatives is that gays and lesbians are “destroying” marriage, how can gays and lesbians destroy a thing which America’s straight couples have been actively destroying for a century? Think about it. And let’s be brutally honest. Rampant divorce. Rampant infidelity. Rampant abuse of spouses and children. I don’t think those are the legacy of a people who collectively believe marriage to be sacred. If I feel anything on the issue of marriage, I feel that marriage (by

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Is a financial crisis about to erupt worldwide?

I’ve said before that the next major financial crisis may arise when any one of a number of factors – or a combination of them – suddenly erupts.  Right now there are several such factors that are poised on a knife-edge.  If two or more of them blow up . . . I think the next worldwide financial crisis will be upon us. Greece is poised to default on its debts and (probably) exit the Eurozone.  This crisis has been brewing for years, but is now near boiling point.  It’s fundamentally about much more than just Greece.  As the Telegraph

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Immigrants, jobs – and machines

In the light of my previous article about automation threatening many current jobs, I was both heartened and provoked to thought by this report from the BBC. On the flat plains of the Po Valley is the small town of Novellara, in the province of Reggio Emilia. It’s not far from the city of Parma – and from Parma and Reggio Emilia comes the name of one of the world’s most famous cheeses, Parmigiano Reggiano… in English, Parmesan. Under EU rules, it has to be made exclusively from milk produced and transformed into cheese in this area of northern Italy.

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Yet another occupation about to fall to machines?

I’ve written often enough about the dangers posed to our current jobs by a tsunami of automation, robotics and sophisticated machines.  The latest example comes from Australia. An Australian engineer has built a robot that can build houses in two hours, and could work every day to build houses for people. Human housebuilders have to work for four to six weeks to put a house together, and have to take weekends and holidays. The robot can work much more quickly and doesn’t need to take breaks. Hadrian could take the jobs of human bricklayers. But its creator, Mark Pivac, told

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On the ground at LibertyCon

Miss D. and I are having an exhausting, but interesting time at LibertyCon in Chattanooga, TN.  We arrived on Wednesday evening, in the middle of an extremely enervating wave of heat and humidity, and suffered through it until a thunderstorm dropped the temperature nicely yesterday afternoon.  The relief is very welcome indeed! Thursday evening saw the wedding of Sanford Begley and Cedar Sanderson, and the renewal of their wedding vows by Dan and Sarah Hoyt on the occasion of their 30th wedding anniversary.  I was privileged to be a part of both celebrations.  I’m sure many of my readers have

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