“Every house divided against itself will not stand.” That goes for America, too.

In watching the brouhaha over alleged links between President Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russia, and allegations of who said what, when, to whom, and why, and what the words mean, I’m driven to a conclusion already reached by many. This nation is irreparably, irreconcilably divided against itself. That became clear during the Presidential elections last year.  Even before the vote, researchers identified several key areas in which the two sides of our political divide have become more and more divided.  What’s more, that divide has come to dominate different areas and groups in our body politic.  To name just one

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Denver’s city government just lost some more of its marbles

They’ve reduced penalties for a range of offenses, so that miscreants will no longer attract a jail sentence long enough to threaten illegal alien offenders with deportation.  The list includes: Class 1 offenses, which carry a maximum jail one-year jail sentence and/or a $999 fine. Bias-motivated offenses Sexually-motivated offenses Offenses against at-risk persons Assault on a law enforcement officer Assault with serious bodily harm Assault with strangulation Habitual domestic violence offender Class 2 offenses, which carry a maximum 60-day jail sentence and no fine. Sitting or lying in the public right-of-way Unauthorized camping on public or private property prohibited Urinating

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When bureaucrats wipe out your investment

At the time of the banking crisis in Cyprus, a few years ago, I had a lot to say about the new ‘bail-in’ rules that would force investors and depositors, rather than government, to ‘rescue’ a failing bank.  Effectively, the former could be forced to hand over some, or even all, of their money to rescue the bank, even if the bank (or the government) was responsible for the conditions that caused its failure.  Other nations eagerly seized on the idea (after all, what government wants to have to find a few billion in spare cash, without warning?)  North America

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A very versatile hunting holster

I reviewed a couple of compact .44 Magnum revolvers yesterday.  While on the subject of revolvers, I thought I’d mention a holster that’s served me very well with larger ones.  It’s Galco’s Kodiak shoulder/cross-chest holster, fitted with what they call an ‘ammo bandolier‘.  (Click the image for a larger view.) It’s worn low on the chest, with the harness pulling it close into one’s body to stop it swinging.  It’s a very practical arrangement for a large, heavy revolver – much more comfortable than trying to carry it in a belt holster, where its excessive weight and length would drag

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Comparing two compact .44 Magnum revolvers

Readers may remember that in October 2015, I tested two Taurus .44 Magnum revolvers.  One was the full-size, six-shot Model 44 with a 6½” barrel, Taurus’ equivalent of the Smith & Wesson N-frame Model 29.  The other was the smaller, five-shot Model 44Tracker4B, with a 4″ barrel, as shown below. The smaller gun had a few problems, but after some attention from a gunsmith, it proved satisfactory, despite being more difficult to control than its bigger brother (due to its smaller size and lighter weight, both of which provided less heft to soak up the recoil).  I swapped out its

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Twenty years of Harry Potter

(I posted this article this morning at the shared writers blog to which I also belong, Mad Genius Club;  but because I think many of my readers will share my interest in the subject, I’ve cross-posted it here as well.) This month marks twenty years since the publication of the first book in the Harry Potter series, which by some yardsticks is probably the most successful young adult series in literary history. All kudos and congratulations to J. K. Rowling for her success, and for her determination to persevere in the face of what must have seemed, at first, like

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