Electric vehicles as a tool of Big Brother and social control

I note that Governor Jerry Brown of California has some big plans for electric vehicles. Mary Nichols, head of California’s Air Resources Board, told Bloomberg News this week that Brown has been pestering her about getting a gas-car ban on the books. . . . The United Kingdom and France have both said they will ban the sale of gas and diesel by 2040. Norway’s transportation plan calls for all new passenger vehicles to be zero-emission by 2025. India wants to make the switch to electric by 2030. But it’s the People’s Republic of China, currently drafting its own ill-defined

Continue reading

The reason so many NFL players don’t like cops . . .

. . . is apparently because so many of them have been arrested by cops – sometimes for repeated offenses. If you want the short-and-simple version, USA Today has published a list of NFL player arrests going back to the year 2000, in reverse date order.  It’s very informative. For the full, much longer version, a Web site provides searchable information on NFL arrests.  It’s been so overloaded in recent days that the primary site is currently offline;  but it’s been mirrored on a backup site, which is still working. The Web site notes: Keep in mind there are 1700

Continue reading

Making crocodiles look like minnows by comparison

Australian reader Snoggeramus sends us a fascinating report about a dead whale that’s being eaten by salt-water crocodiles. “We had paying passengers from a cruise ship and they had a look at something truly amazing,” Mr Crook said. “When we got there we counted nine crocodiles, quite big at around three metres probably, and they were just tiny compared to this whale, which was maybe a medium sized humpback, not a juvenile but a bit older.” As they circled their [helicopter] around the carcass, later on at least fourteen crocodiles arrived to feast on the dead whale, with some even

Continue reading

More post-hurricane “lessons learned”

Yesterday I put up a post titled “Lessons learned from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria“.  I’ve continued to receive reports from correspondents, so I’ve added some more “lessons learned” to it.  If you’d like to read them, click on the link above to the original post, and scroll down until you find this heading: 6.  More lessons learned:  Friday, September 29, 2017. I won’t say “Enjoy!”, because it’s not a fun subject, but there’s a lot to be learned from the experiences (and mistakes) of others. Peter

Continue reading

Doofus Of The Day #979

A tip o’ the hat to Diogenes’ Middle Finger for spotting this pseudo-scientific idiocy. Playful urination practices – from seeing how high you can pee to games such as Peeball (where men compete using their urine to destroy a ball placed in a urinal) – may give boys an advantage over girls when it comes to physics. . . . Like many parents of small (and not-so-small) boys, two of us (KW and DL) have observed the great delight young males take in urination, a process by which they produce and direct a visible projectile arc. The fact that boys

Continue reading

Larry Correia brings the smackdown again . . .

. . . this time responding to a particularly clueless and uninformed rant against firearm suppressors. The following post is from author Elizabeth Moon, who is an extremely good science fiction writer, but who apparently knows jack shit about guns. Which is kind of sad, since she was a Marine. There is so much wrong with this post that … I’m going to have to break it down and fisk it line by line … . . . There is so much nonsense in there that it is going to take some time to refute it all. This is a

Continue reading

Don’t blame the Federal government for Puerto Rico’s aid crisis

The chronic mismanagement, inefficiency and sclerotic bureaucracy of Puerto Rico continue to take their toll on residents after Hurricane Maria.  The New York Post reports: “There are plenty of ships and plenty of cargo to come into the island,” said Mark Miller, a spokesman for shipping company Crowley, which has 3,000 containers of supplies in the US territory. “From there, that’s where the supply chain breaks down — getting the goods from the port to the people on the island who need them,” he told Bloomberg News. Around 9,500 containers carrying supplies remained stuck at the Port of San Juan

Continue reading

How do you say “Oops!” in Russian?

Last week I showed a Russian Air Force Tupolev Tu-22M3 bomber make a very, very long takeoff, leaving a cloud of dust at the runway threshold as it lifted off just in time. This one didn’t make it at all.  Running out of runway, its pilot deployed its braking parachutes as he tried to stop – but to no avail. Listening to the sounds, it looks as if the tail section – visible towards the end of the clip – broke off and came to a stop, while the rest of the plane kept on going for a while.  There

Continue reading

Lessons learned from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria

After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, I wrote a series of “lessons learned” points, which I combined into an article on this blog some time later.  It’s consistently among the most viewed articles here, so I hope it’s done some good. As the wider picture is emerging after Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, Hurricane Irma hit Florida, and Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico over the past couple of months, there have been more useful lessons coming out of the experiences of my correspondents (and from news media articles).  I’m going to summarize some of them here.  I’ll add to this

Continue reading

At these numbers, why NOT build the wall?

I noted an article yesterday, headlined: Record $135 billion a year for illegal immigration, average $8,075 each, $25,000 in NY It began: The swelling population of illegal immigrants and their kids is costing American taxpayers $135 billion a year, the highest ever, driven by free medical care, education and a huge law enforcement bill, according to the the most authoritative report on the issue yet. And despite claims from pro-illegal immigration advocates that the aliens pay significant off-setting taxes back to federal, state and local treasuries, the Federation for American Immigration Reform report tallied just $19 billion, making the final

Continue reading