Inflation and your clothes (literally)

I’m still mind-boggled after reading this report. After London College of Fashion designer Harikrishnan unveiled his inflatable latex trousers that come in a variety of colours, people couldn’t help but make fun of the high fashion number. The quirky graduate collection featured billowing latex trousers which are tapered at the ankle. But folks in their droves took to Twitter to say it looked more like ‘swollen testicles’. Tough crowd. Clearly the essence of the piece was lost on the audience. There’s more at the link. Looks more like an inverted life-jacket to me.  Let’s call it a death-jacket.  Fall into the water

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Rape, political correctness, and the real world

Yet again we’ve seen the usual suspects scream in outrage at even the suggestion that women’s behavior might just possibly contribute to their getting raped.  This time it’s in Kenya. A top Kenyan university has apologised after blaming “reckless” female students for becoming victims of rape. The security memo, which was sent to all students on Tuesday, was “insensitive”, the University of Nairobi’s vice-chancellor admitted. A petition started in response to the memo questioned how women could be blamed for their own rape. Popular media personality, Adelle Onyango, posted on Instagram: “This is what victim shaming looks like.” . . .

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An opinionated, one-sided bigot, posing as a journalist

I have no sympathy for ABC News correspondent David Wright after he was suspended by his network for comments he made to a Project Veritas investigator.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. ABC News has suspended veteran Washington correspondent David Wright for remarks he made that were captured on video by Project Veritas. Wright was disciplined after higher-ups at ABC News reviewed footage in which Wright describes himself as a “socialist” and appears to criticize the network for the way in which it chooses to present the news. “I feel terrible about it. I feel that the truth suffers, the voters are poorly

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Double “Heh!” – automotive edition

Yesterday both of these photographs were sent to me by readers.  I don’t know their origin, but they made me laugh. First, Toyota’s mid-size SUV is visually linked to a famous movie (click the image for a larger view): Next, modern motoring leads to a new musical conundrum: As long as the truck doesn’t have an open container of beer (another country music staple) in the cab . . . Peter

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COVID-19: an update, and planning considerations

Last week I wrote about preparing for the economic impact of China’s coronavirus epidemic.  It now looks certain that it’s going to cause major disruptions to world trade, and probably to the social fabric of many (perhaps most) countries – including the United States.  COVID-19 is showing a very rapid infection rate, far faster than might be expected.  South Korea went from zero reported cases to (at the time of writing) 1,146 infected and 11 dead in less than a week.  Italy has gone from zero to 229 infected and 7 dead in a similar period.  The USA now has 53 confirmed cases,

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OK, warbird fans, you can geek out now

A treasure trove of World War II-era aviation blueprints have been saved for posterity.  Warbird Digest reports: AirCorps Aviation of Bemidji, Minnesota has just announced that they have acquired a massive trove of original manufacturing drawings for North American Aviation (NAA) covering types such as the P-51, T-6, B-25 and P-82. Ken Jungeberg was the head of the Master Dimensions department at Columbus in 1988 when the factory closed its doors. When he heard that North American was planning to burn all the WWII era drawings in their archive, he knew he had to do something. He began writing letters and making calls to his superiors, advocating to save

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How much were can a werewolf wear if a werewolf could wear wolf?

The headline was inspired by a blog post and question from author Charles Stross, who poses a couple of intriguing questions. SERIOUS QUESTION for space geeks: The flight of Apollo 11. Postulate that Mike Collins is a werewolf. At what point during trans-Lunar injection does he go furry? And how many times during the mission profile is he forced to shapeshift by the light of the full Moon? ANOTHER SERIOUS SPACE QUESTION: A full Moon must subtend an angle of at least 0.5 degrees to trigger shapeshifting in werewolves. A werewolf is aboard a spaceship bound for Ganymede, largest moon of Jupiter.

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No, it doesn’t figure

The BBC points out that the so-called “gambler’s fallacy” has never worked, and never will.  It’s a mathematical calculation that many don’t understand. … a reasoning flaw called the “gambler’s fallacy” [is] a worryingly common error that can derail many of our professional decisions, from a goalkeeper’s responses to penalty shootouts in football to stock market investments and even judicial rulings on new asylum cases. To find out if you fall for the gambler’s fallacy, imagine you are tossing a (fair) coin and you get the following sequence: Heads, Heads, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails, Tails. What’s the

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Concerning Michael Bloomberg and farmers

. . . which we’ve previously addressed here and here, I received this image over the weekend via e-mail (origin unknown). Makes sense to me.  When I look at the size of Michael Bloomberg’s fortune (over $60 billion, by all accounts), I have to ask how much “dirt” went into amassing so great an amount.  If it all happened without a single lapse in ethics or honesty, and entirely within the law, I’ll go out and buy a hat so that I can eat it! (Of course, the same applies to most large fortunes, irrespective of the political affiliations and/or ambitions of their

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The “ruling class” are losing their grip

Tucker Carlson addressed the issue last week.  This five-minute clip is well worth your time. Andrew Codevilla, whom we’ve often met in these pages, discussed the “ruling class” a decade ago.  His insights then are as valid today as always. Never has there been so little diversity within America’s upper crust. Always, in America as elsewhere, some people have been wealthier and more powerful than others. But until our own time America’s upper crust was a mixture of people who had gained prominence in a variety of ways, who drew their money and status from different sources and were not predictably

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