Doofus Of The Day #1,051

Today’s award goes to actor Alec Baldwin for this tweet about the death by suicide, while in prison, of Jeffrey Epstein: He shares the award with Ron Perlman, Brian Koppelman, Dave Bautista, George Takei, and probably others in the Hollywood kafeeklatsch, all of whom also inferred a Russian hand of some sort in Epstein’s death. I agree that Epstein’s suicide was, and remains, highly suspicious, with enough grounds for doubt as to what happened to keep us guessing for years to come . . . but Russia?  Really?  I’d have thought there’s nothing Russia would have liked more than to have Epstein’s “little black book” (and video

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“Anxiety simmers as mass shootings loom any time, anywhere”

That’s the headline of an article in the Detroit Free Press. Motorcycles backfired in Times Square last week. It sounded like gunfire, and panic ensued in the heart of New York City. The same night, a sign fell during a concert at a Utah mall. The loud bang when it hit the floor sounded something like a gunshot, and sent people racing into stores to hide. Balloons popped in a dorm in March on the University of Michigan campus. Outside, a vigil was underway for those killed in the massacre at mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. Dozens of students heard the loud

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Early warning signs that Mexico may follow Venezuela’s example?

American Thinker notes two worrying developments in Mexico. We try to stay in touch with Mexico.  This week, we saw a couple of articles that should worry the Mexican middle class. First, Presidente López-Obrador is making investors a bit weary, according to Richard Castillo via Pulse News Mexico: Fear does not ride on a burro; it flies at the speed of sound! And spreading fear of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s (AMLO) economic policies seems to be the leading reason that Mexico’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has slumped markedly to the point of reaching a minimal growth of 0.1 percent for the

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Some 20-year-old pain medications still work

I’ve long been aware of studies suggesting that some prescription medications can retain their potency for several years past the expiration date shown on their labels (which is typically one year after they were issued to a customer).  I must admit, though, I’ve recently been pleasantly surprised by one prescription issued to me twenty years ago. I recently had a bout with severe, immobilizing back pain, which is slowly easing off (the inevitable result of a partially disabling injury back in 2004, which resulted in a spinal fusion and permanent nerve damage).  The doctor (not my usual one) initially prescribed

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Here’s one proposed law I think we can all support

Whether one’s on the left or the right of US politics, some things are more important than political orientation.  I think this is one of them. A coalition of six Republican and three Democratic senators wants officials to inventory the costs, goals, and performance of all federal programs, then post the resulting database on the internet. . . . The purpose of the proposal is to “provide taxpayers with an improved understanding of government programs through the disclosure of cost, performance, and areas of duplication among them, leverage existing data to achieve a functional Federal program inventory,” according to the bill’s text.

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“Igniting Civil War”

That’s the title of an article by Prof. Angelo Codevilla, whom we’ve met in these pages several times before.  I’ve learned to respect his views very highly, because they’ve proven prescient over a long period.  Here’s an excerpt. It all starts with getting people accustomed to hating each other. And that starts at the top. Saying hateful things about one’s opponents is a time-tested way of stoking supporters’ enthusiasm, of building support for one’s own side. But when blood is spilled, someone, then everyone else, tends to use it as a pretext for inciting more violence. That’s the meaning of blood-feud. . .

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Weirdly cute, but is it practical?

A photograph over at Daily Timewaster led me to investigate this strange-looking knife.  It’s the Daktyl model from CRKT. I understand it’s not the first side-opening knife CRKT has produced.  I couldn’t help but wonder why.  I mean, apart from the cuteness factor, why not use a traditional knife body, one that protects the blade against other debris in one’s pocket?  I can see a receipt, or something like that, slipping between the outer wire frame and the edge of the blade, and getting cut when you pull one or the other out of your pocket. However, the reviews on Amazon are sometimes fun.  Examples:

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Suicide??? YGTBSM!!!

So, according to news reports, Jeffrey Epstein committed suicide last night . . . while on suicide watch in prison. Yeah.  Right. Folks, I served as a Federal prison chaplain.  I was trained in exactly the same way as a corrections officer, alongside them in the same training institution, because there would be times when I’d have to function as one.  I know more than a little about suicide watches, and I’ve been exposed to my fair share of them.  You can read a little about them in this Slate article, but there’s a lot more to them than that. Basically, on suicide watch, everything and anything that

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H. L. Mencken’s recipe for dealing with activist judges

Both sides of the political spectrum in the USA have from time to time expressed “reservations” (euphemism!) at the decisions of judges that affect causes, laws and activities which they support.  Ninety-five years ago, H. L. Mencken had a suggestion on how to deal with them. To punish a judge taken in judicial crim. con. by fining him or sending him to jail is a bit too facile and obvious. What is needed is a system (a) that does not depend for its execution upon the good-will of fellow jobholders, and (b) that provides swift, certain and unpedantic punishments, each fitted neatly to its crime.

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