Tragic news from SayUncle

Well-known gun-blogger SayUncle’s wife died suddenly and without any warning a few days ago. On March 20th, my beloved wife and mother of my children, unexpectedly went into cardiac arrest. She had never presented any symptoms prior to then. On March 21st, her doctor informed me that her brain was no longer functioning and there was no chance of recovery. On March 22nd, in accordance with her wishes outlined in her living will, I authorized the medical staff to remove life support. She passed away peacefully at 8:48am central time while I held her hand. She will be missed. March 23rd

Continue reading

COVID-19: Our politicians are fiddling while Rome burns

As readers doubtless already know, partisan bickering has stalled the progress of the biggest-yet economic rescue package through the United States Congress.  I’m not blaming one side or the other, because both are equally at fault.  Republicans are focused far too strongly on bailing out big corporations at the expense of small business and individuals, to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars.  Democrats are focused far too strongly on bailing out individuals at the expense of corporations, and adding new funding for their favored causes like abortion, welfare and Social Security.  Neither side has clean hands;  both sides are trying to “load” the

Continue reading

Socialism in action: we’ll seize your home to help the homeless!

If you own rental property in California, or just want to renovate your own home before moving back in, you may be out of luck.  A new bill introduced in the state government would allow the confiscation of your property after just 90 days standing empty. The issue of homelessness in California is a problem in need of addressing and worthy of creating ideal solutions to remedy. But should that solution to homelessness be resolved by what some might consider to be legislated theft? Because the recently introduced Senate Bill 1079, if enacted, could force an entity to sell their home to

Continue reading

Be careful what you wish for

I had to laugh at a suggestion from an Australian economist concerning the run on toilet paper supplies in that country, thanks to the coronavirus epidemic.  There really does seem to be a panic about it there, as this video from an Aldi store in Sydney demonstrates. Alfredo Paloyo offers his views, including this suggestion. There are two other solutions. The first is for the government to step in as guarantor. In 2008, for example, the market crash engendered by the subprime mortgage crisis left multiple Australian banks vulnerable to depositor runs. In response, the Australian government announced a guarantee scheme

Continue reading

COVID-19: Time for a dose of realism

The media hysteria surrounding the coronavirus epidemic (which doesn’t yet deserve that name in any part of the world but China, BTW) is getting repetitive and annoying.  What’s even worse are attempts by his political opponents (aided and abetted by the generally anti-Trump news media) to make the President appear responsible for it, and to hold him accountable for every “failure” or “mistake” or “misstep” or inept behavior by officials that comes to light.  That’s simply not true, as any investigation of the facts will demonstrate. See, also, the hysteria surrounding Vice-President Pence, who is (according to some news media) allegedly

Continue reading

“The Roots of Our Partisan Divide”

That’s the title of a long and very interesting article by Christopher Caldwell.  Basically, he argues that a culture of “civil rights” has usurped, and threatens to overthrow (and may perhaps already have overthrown) the constitutional foundation of our republic.  I’m going to quote from it at some length, in an attempt to capture the essence of his argument. But it is a third strand of the story, running all the way down to our day, that is most important for explaining our partisan polarization. It concerns how the civil rights laws of the 1960s, and particularly the Civil Rights Act of 1964, divided

Continue reading

AG Barr, the Department of Justice and the coup attempt

James Howard Kunstler weighs in on the growing controversy over prosecutions (or the lack thereof) in the Department of Justice. You are forgiven for failing to follow all the twists and turns in this latest installment of what might now be called CoupGate, a summation of the seditious campaign to overthrow the president, which already has gone through so many gates — SpyGate, RussiaGate, MuellerGate, UkraineGate, WhistleblowerGate — that Mr. Trump looks like he’s spent three years training for the giant slalom in the next winter Olympics. A localized Civil War is underway in the Department of Justice now. Mr. Barr

Continue reading

SOCOM and the USAF: the internal politics could get interesting, to put it mildly

I was intrigued to read that the US Special Operations Command is looking into fielding up to 75 light attack aircraft. The US Special Operations Command plans on buying 75 fixed-wing aircraft for its just-announced Armed Overwatch program. The aircraft are intended for close air support of special operations troops, according to a notice announcing an upcoming industry day posted online 3 February. “Armed Overwatch will provide Special Operations Forces deployable and sustainable manned aircraft systems fulfilling close air support, precision strike, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance in austere and permissive environments,” says the notice. The program is similar to a faltering light attack

Continue reading

US naval expenditure: is reality finally beginning to bite?

I’ve long been annoyed and frustrated at the US Navy’s visible incompetence and waste of taxpayers’ time and money in designing, building and commissioning new generations of warships.  The “Little Crappy Ship” imbroglio, the Zumwalt train wreck and the USS Gerald R. Ford’s litany of failures are only the first three programs to come to mind – there are many more.  Therefore, I wasn’t surprised to see the Defense Secretary’s decision about funding a new generation of nuclear missile submarines. After years of warnings from U.S. Navy leaders that replacing the aging Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine will eat the service’s shipbuilding account alive, the year the first Columbia-class submarine is

Continue reading

The easy way to lower crime rates – fudge the statistics!

The Chicago Sun-Times points out that crime statistics for that city are being deliberately “fudged” by manipulating them.  This is, of course, a problem nation-wide, not just in the Windy City;  but it’s good to see the issue brought out in public. Closing more murder cases even though no one was arrested pumped up the high clearance rate the Chicago Police Department has touted, a Chicago Sun-Times analysis finds. The police department cleared more murder cases in 2019 that didn’t result in an arrest than it has done in years, the Sun-Times found … of the 261 murders that the police signed

Continue reading