Borepatch hits one out of the park

Fellow blogger Borepatch has put up an excellent article titled “How Big Business and Big Government get ahead by slowing down the economy“.  Here’s an excerpt. … well managed companies excel at managing innovation … What they don’t excel at – because they’re well managed – is bringing the next, new [innovation] to the market.  You see, the products in that innovation stream very well might undercut their current cash cow products. So what do they do?  Enter the Regulatory State.  The Government starts issuing all sorts of regulations about this and that, to protect children and kittens and sunshine. 

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How is it possible that California can’t provide a record of what it’s spent???

This simply boggles my mind.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. Just a few of the serious financial problems facing California include unfunded public employee pension promises, a potential state credit downgrade, an unprecedented homeless crisis, and a net out-migration of 912,000 residents since 2010. One easy step California can take is to join every other state in the union and open up its state checkbook for review. Allowing citizens, journalists, watchdogs, academics, and public policy experts to review state spending would help the state get its fiscal house in order. Unfortunately, last fall, California State Controller Betty Yee (pictured) rejected

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An American dystopia – but is it deliberate?

There’s an old military saying that you’ve seen in these pages before.  “Once is happenstance;  twice is coincidence;  three or more times is enemy action.”  It’s often attributed to Ian Fleming, from his James Bond novel “Goldfinger”, but it’s far older than that.  I’ve seen similar sentiments expressed in eighteenth-century writings.  Basically, it means that if the same thing happens, with similar results, too many times, it’s not accidental or coincidental.  Instead, someone’s out to get you, and you need to do something serious about them before they do. I find myself repeating that saying when I consider the catastrophic

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Potential for voter fraud? Oh, heck, yes .

Kudos to Judicial Watch for stepping up to the plate and continuing its investigation and activist intervention in states and counties that are not maintaining their voters rolls properly.  In a press release, the organization said: Judicial Watch announced today it is continuing its efforts to force states and counties across the nation to comply with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), by sending notice-of-violation letters to 19 large counties in five states that it intends to sue unless the jurisdictions take steps to comply with the law and remove ineligible voter registrations within 90 days. Section 8 of the National

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The IG report’s whitewashing of the FBI is statistically unbelievable

Karl Denninger points out that a statistical analysis of the Inspector General’s report on the FBI investigation into President Trump reveals that it’s fundamentally impossible. The IG report, after reading through a good part of it, states that seventeen “errors” were made by the FBI. May I remind you of an indisputable fact: Errors are randomly distributed. That is, let’s assume you intend to drive at 40mph.  If you make an error you will operate your car some of the time at 38mph, and some of the time at 42mph.  The errors, if they are actual errors, will be randomly distributed around the correct action.  Some of the errors will

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“Government employees multiplying like rabbits”

That’s the title of a thought-provoking article at BizPacReview.  Here’s an excerpt. By 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics stated there were 80% more people employed by government in America than those employed in the manufacturing sector. And federal, state and local governments employed about 21 million people. By October, 2019, this number had risen to 24,421,000 government workers, if we include the 1.4 million military employees. Of this amount, 17.3% worked for the federal government, 21.9% worked for state government, and 60.8% were employed by local governments. The expanding federal government helps to explain why this country is running a federal

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California’s homeless crisis: a musical explanation

We’ve visited the homelessness crisis before.  It’s particularly bad in Los Angeles, but the same problem exists in other Californian cities (e.g. San Diego). This video may be labeled a “parody”, but there’s an awful lot of truth in it. My take on the subject is that as long as government is expected to provide the solution, there won’t be one.  Government sees only the opportunity to spend lots of our money, and create lots of new jobs for their bureaucratic drones, while ignoring the reality of the situation.  In fact, it’s in their best interests not to solve the problem – otherwise what would they do with all those

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Bureaucrats don’t like non-compliant, rebellious serfs

The Foundation for Economic Education highlights how bureaucrats weaponize the child protection system against parents wanting to protect their children from increasingly dysfunctional schools. Schooling is adept at rooting out individuality and enforcing compliance. In his book, Understanding Power, Noam Chomsky writes: “In fact, the whole educational and professional training system is a very elaborate filter, which just weeds out people who are too independent, and who think for themselves, and who don’t know how to be submissive, and so on—because they’re dysfunctional to the institutions.” This filtering process begins very early in a child’s schooling as conformity is rewarded and divergence

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New York City exports its homeless problem

This doesn’t surprise me, and it’s hardly confined to New York City;  but the sheer brazenness of the bureaucrats is mind-boggling.  “Let’s dump our problems on other cities, without bothering to tell them what’s on the way!” New York City generously shares its homeless crisis with every corner of America. From the tropical shores of Honolulu and Puerto Rico, to the badlands of Utah and backwaters of Louisiana, the Big Apple has sent local homeless families to 373 cities across the country with a full year of rent in their pockets as part of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s “Special One-Time Assistance

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