“There’s more than one way to skin a cat” – illegal alien edition

The headline is an old saying from the 19th century that I still enjoy.  It’s still valid, in almost every walk of life.  President Trump has just illustrated that in dealing with the invasion of this country by illegal aliens. Donald Trump’s policies to deal with the crisis on our southern border are working as intended. Mark Morgan, acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection commissioner, says that daily apprehensions of illegal aliens have fallen from about 4,000 at the height of the crisis to around 1,300 now. What’s more, the 21-day average is less than 1,000 — a 78 percent drop over the

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Important lessons to learn from the Texas church shooting

I’ve been watching the security camera footage of the Texas church shooting last Sunday, and reading as much as I can find about it.  It contains some important lessons for all of us, not just in terms of church security, but our personal approach to security as well. Here’s an excerpt from an interview with the man who shot the criminal.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. Wilson recalled the events leading up to Sunday’s shooting and said there was concern about the individual as soon as he entered the building due to the way he was dressed, in a long coat with a fake beard

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80 years of MiG fighters

The aircraft design bureau headed by Artem Mikoyan and Mikhail Gurevich, which has gone down in history by the amalgamation of the first letters of their last names as MiG, was formed on December 8th, 1939 – 80 years ago, plus a few days.  Today it’s the “Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG” division of United Aircraft Corporation of Russia, and is still going strong. To celebrate the anniversary, the company produced this short video highlighting several of its most famous designs, from the MiG-1 and MiG-3 fighters of World War II, to the MiG-15 that terrorized Allied aircraft during the Korean War, to the MiG-17, –19 and –21 of the Vietnam War era, to the MiG-29 that

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Sneaky – but it paid off

The Miami Dolphins seem to make a habit of bringing off tricky plays that fool their opposition.  They did it again last weekend, with this fake kick at goal that turned into a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles.  Miami won the game 37-31. It came almost exactly a year after the Dolphins’ famous “Miracle in Miami” touchdown against the New England Patriots, which still draws admiring and disbelieving comment from fans across the spectrum.  The play took place with only 7 seconds remaining in the match.  Talk about a nail-biter! Full marks to the Dolphins for both scores.  They aren’t in contention

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Ebola: new drugs show promise, but we’re not out of the woods yet

I’m encouraged to hear that two new drugs to treat Ebola are showing promise, but the process of testing them has been fraught with difficulty – and bloodshed.  Nature reports: The race to develop treatments for Ebola has accelerated since the largest epidemic in history devastated West Africa between 2014 and 2016. Scientists responding to the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) have enrolled more than 500 participants in an unprecedented study of experimental drugs, vaccinated nearly 170,000 people, and sequenced the genomes of more than 270 Ebola samples collected from the sick. . . . Working

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The Holy Grail of the nuclear industry

I note with interest that Lockheed Martin’s experiments with nuclear fusion technology are moving right along. Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works is building a new, more capable test reactor as it continues to move ahead with its ambitious Compact Fusion Reactor program, or CFR. Despite slower than expected progress, the company remains confident the project can produce practical results, which would completely transform how power gets generated for both military and civilian purposes. . . . “The work we have done today verifies our models and shows that the physics we are talking about – the basis of what we are trying to do – is sound,”

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I daresay Sgt. Furrh was looking down and smiling proudly

Here’s your feel-good story of the week. Terri Furrh was a little confused at first when she was asked to get out of alphabetical order at the Moulton High School graduation Friday night and go to the back of the line. But as soon as principal Jamie Dornak spoke about the stretch of highway between Moulton and Shiner, a line of law enforcement officers and first responders walked up to the left side of the stage in the gymnasium in place of their fallen brother, the late Sgt. David Furrh, she understood. . . . Furrh was killed in 2000 while

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An excellent first novel

Jason Fuesting and his wife have been online friends with my wife for some time, although I’ve only met them once, during a trip to St. Louis some months ago.  Jason’s a military veteran, and has been working hard on a science fiction trilogy for a long time.  He’s finally let loose Volume 1 on the world – and it’s a very good effort indeed. I had the privilege of beta-reading “By Dawn’s Early Light” prior to publication, and found it absorbing and interesting.  Jason certainly has his own voice, and a gifted way of setting up his characters and

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OK, that was a goal to remember!

I’m not a big fan of ice hockey, and seldom watch it:  but this goal by Aleksander Barkov yesterday, for the Florida Panthers against the Montreal Canadiens, was really something.  He fired the puck backwards, between his legs, to wrong-foot the goalie.  Watch the slo-mo replay to see it. Talk about a man on top of his game!  What’s more, he’s only 23 years old, with many years of development still to come.  What’s he going to be like at 33? Barkov ended up with a hat-trick, and the Panthers defeated Montreal 6-3.  Congratulations to all concerned. Peter

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