Buying the Democratic Party presidential nomination, redux

Last week I asked, “Can Bloomberg buy the US presidency?”  In a series of tweets a few days later, journalist Blake Zeff indicates that he can – and is already doing so.  Here’s a short sample. The degree to which Michael Bloomberg is using his fortune to fundamentally alter & manipulate U.S. politics to his personal advantage extends way beyond ads. I’ve worked against him, covered him as a journalist & worked with his top aides. Here’s their playbook: Let’s start with endorsements. Background: Bloomberg was a GOP mayor & Rudy Giuliani ally, whose police stopped innocent black men so often his

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Buying the Democratic Party presidential nomination, redux

Last week I asked, “Can Bloomberg buy the US presidency?”  In a series of tweets a few days later, journalist Blake Zeff indicates that he can – and is already doing so.  Here’s a short sample. The degree to which Michael Bloomberg is using his fortune to fundamentally alter & manipulate U.S. politics to his personal advantage extends way beyond ads. I’ve worked against him, covered him as a journalist & worked with his top aides. Here’s their playbook: Let’s start with endorsements. Background: Bloomberg was a GOP mayor & Rudy Giuliani ally, whose police stopped innocent black men so often his

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When civilized methods fail, the law of the jungle takes over

Adam Piggott points out that President Duterte of the Philippines may be a disaster from a modern, liberal, human-rights perspective, but he’s very popular among his people for precisely the same reason. Duterte has been in office for roughly the same time as Trump has been president, but we can call Duterte the forgotten man. When he first gained power the western press was all over him, how he was a horrible individual who was guilty of “human rights” abuses, blah blah blah, you know the drill. This went on for some time until suddenly it didn’t. From rather a lot of coverage

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The easy way to lower crime rates – fudge the statistics!

The Chicago Sun-Times points out that crime statistics for that city are being deliberately “fudged” by manipulating them.  This is, of course, a problem nation-wide, not just in the Windy City;  but it’s good to see the issue brought out in public. Closing more murder cases even though no one was arrested pumped up the high clearance rate the Chicago Police Department has touted, a Chicago Sun-Times analysis finds. The police department cleared more murder cases in 2019 that didn’t result in an arrest than it has done in years, the Sun-Times found … of the 261 murders that the police signed

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Saturday Snippet: the 1929 stock market slams headlong into reality

In their book “The Day the Bubble Burst“, Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan-Witts examine the human side of the 1929 stock market crash that precipitated the Great Depression. There are many parallels between the behavior of markets and individuals prior to the Crash, and those we see today.  The divide between the “haves” and the “have-nots” is at least as pronounced today, if not more so, and of course there are many more people in the country – and the world – to be affected by such divisions.  Attitudes are also very materialistic, the focus entirely on worldly reward and material

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Should we treat pornography like an epidemic? A growing body of evidence suggests that’s what it is.

A very long and detailed article titled “A Science-Based Case for Ending the Porn Epidemic” examines what pornography has done to our society, particularly since the rise of the Internet.  It makes a strong case that pornography is a public health crisis, not just an issue of morality. I’ve included a few brief excerpts from the article here, but it’s far longer and more detailed than I can summarize in a blog article such as this.  I urge you to click through and read the whole thing for yourself.  I’m sure some of my readers will disagree with its conclusions; 

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The Superbowl, sex, and society

Like millions of other Americans, I watched Super Bowl 54 last night.  The game itself was good, with two teams going at it for all they were worth.  Since I didn’t have a favorite to support, I was able to enjoy the game overall, and support the sport rather than a tribal favorite participant.  The Kansas City Chiefs won, but that was only clinched in the last quarter of the game.  Up until then, their opponents, the San Francisco 49ers, could have won as well – both teams were very evenly matched.  Congratulations to both sides. What really saddened me – and

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An American dystopia – but is it deliberate?

There’s an old military saying that you’ve seen in these pages before.  “Once is happenstance;  twice is coincidence;  three or more times is enemy action.”  It’s often attributed to Ian Fleming, from his James Bond novel “Goldfinger”, but it’s far older than that.  I’ve seen similar sentiments expressed in eighteenth-century writings.  Basically, it means that if the same thing happens, with similar results, too many times, it’s not accidental or coincidental.  Instead, someone’s out to get you, and you need to do something serious about them before they do. I find myself repeating that saying when I consider the catastrophic

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You trust your local government at your peril

Wendell Phillips said in 1852: Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty; power is ever stealing from the many to the few. The manna of popular liberty must be gathered each day or it is rotten. The living sap of today outgrows the dead rind of yesterday. The hand entrusted with power becomes, either from human depravity or esprit de corps, the necessary enemy of the people. Only by continued oversight can the democrat in office be prevented from hardening into a despot; only by unintermitted agitation can a people be sufficiently awake to principle not to let liberty be smothered in

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The IG report’s whitewashing of the FBI is statistically unbelievable

Karl Denninger points out that a statistical analysis of the Inspector General’s report on the FBI investigation into President Trump reveals that it’s fundamentally impossible. The IG report, after reading through a good part of it, states that seventeen “errors” were made by the FBI. May I remind you of an indisputable fact: Errors are randomly distributed. That is, let’s assume you intend to drive at 40mph.  If you make an error you will operate your car some of the time at 38mph, and some of the time at 42mph.  The errors, if they are actual errors, will be randomly distributed around the correct action.  Some of the errors will

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