“The airplanes that rescue Ebola patients”

That’s the title of a very interesting article in Popular Mechanics.  It’s a long article with a lot of detail, far too much to include here;  but I’ll post a series of short excerpts to give you an idea. … two humanitarian medical workers helping out with the Ebola crisis in Liberia had come down with it. Their names were Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, and while everyone wanted to get them home, they had no idea how to do so safely. “The general dogma was, you don’t bring the zombie apocalypse to a city that doesn’t have zombies,” Walters says. But

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Ebola – are officials concealing its spread?

In a July article about the Ebola crisis in Congo, I wrote: Officials in surrounding countries are terrified of admitting to Ebola cases on their territory, because they may bring with them restrictions on travel, trade, and all sorts of things that may affect their economies – and, consequently, the graft, bribery and corruption they rely on to fill their wallets. Can’t have that interrupted, can we? This is Africa, after all! I hate being right about something so serious – but it looks as if I was. The World Health Organization issued an extraordinary statement Saturday raising concerns about possible unreported Ebola cases in

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Ebola: just like I’ve been sayin’

Strategy Page brings us the latest on the Ebola epidemic in the Congo.  I’ve bolded and underlined a few key sentences that reinforce what I’ve been saying for months. In early August Congolese government health officials publicly stated what everyone suspected: many doctors and health care workers believe the medical relief effort is identifying only half of Congo’s Ebola virus (Ebola hemorrhagic fever) cases. That meant the current epidemic that began in August 2018, could continue another three years. During August 2019 the government and WHO (World Health Organization) confirmed the virus has spread from Ituri and North Kivu provinces to a third Congo

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Ebola: new drugs show promise, but we’re not out of the woods yet

I’m encouraged to hear that two new drugs to treat Ebola are showing promise, but the process of testing them has been fraught with difficulty – and bloodshed.  Nature reports: The race to develop treatments for Ebola has accelerated since the largest epidemic in history devastated West Africa between 2014 and 2016. Scientists responding to the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) have enrolled more than 500 participants in an unprecedented study of experimental drugs, vaccinated nearly 170,000 people, and sequenced the genomes of more than 270 Ebola samples collected from the sick. . . . Working

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Ebola is now a global health emergency – for the second time

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2013-16 was declared a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” by the World Health Organization, one of only five such events in history that have been officially given that title.  I don’t know that the declaration did much in practical terms, apart from give warm fuzzies to the bureaucrats who issued it;  but it did underline the seriousness of the outbreak, and the potential threat it posed.  The world avoided a major international health crisis by the skin of its collective teeth in that outbreak, by shutting down as much travel as possible from the

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Ebola: the latest developments

I’ve warned often enough about the dangers of the Ebola outbreak in the Congo.  Aesop, over at Raconteur Report, has done the same.  I don’t see any point in doing so again – if people haven’t listened before, they won’t listen now.  Instead, I’ll just point out that events are proceeding almost exactly as Aesop and I have predicted they would.  Click each headline below for more information. 1.  Ebola reaches Uganda Uganda announced two more cases of Ebola on Wednesday – a grandmother and a three-year-old boy, confirming that a deadly outbreak has spread for the first time beyond the Democratic Republic of

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