Tragic news from SayUncle

Well-known gun-blogger SayUncle’s wife died suddenly and without any warning a few days ago. On March 20th, my beloved wife and mother of my children, unexpectedly went into cardiac arrest. She had never presented any symptoms prior to then. On March 21st, her doctor informed me that her brain was no longer functioning and there was no chance of recovery. On March 22nd, in accordance with her wishes outlined in her living will, I authorized the medical staff to remove life support. She passed away peacefully at 8:48am central time while I held her hand. She will be missed. March 23rd

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Why the consumer supply chain is disrupted at present

The Last Refuge recently published an article analyzing why we’re experiencing shortages of certain goods, and why the consumer supply chain is disrupted.  It’s one of the best explanations I’ve yet read on the subject.  Here’s an excerpt. Most consumers are not aware food consumption in the U.S. is now a 50/50 proposition. Approximately 50% of all food was consumed “outside the home” (or food away from home), and 50% of all food consumed was food “inside the home” (grocery shoppers). Food ‘outside the home’ includes: restaurants, fast-food locales, schools, corporate cafeterias, university lunchrooms, manufacturing cafeterias, hotels, food trucks, park and amusement

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That’s telling them!

Received via e-mail, origin unknown: I couldn’t have put it better myself . . . “Panic buying” is distinctly different from buying what one needs to be prepared for a given period.  “Prepping” means working out meal plans, deciding what one needs for the number of people involved over the period concerned, and then buying those things according to a pre-planned shopping list.  That’s good, and healthy, and I’ve done it for years.  “Panic buying” is dashing into the store and buying anything and everything that one decides, on the spur of the moment, might be useful. Miss D. and I

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Saturday snippet: Doses of economic reality

Instead of putting up my usual Saturday snippet of an excerpt from a book, today, in the light of the coronavirus situation, I’d like to post snippets from three articles that summarize where we are today, and show a trend that’s certain to continue for at least a few months, if not considerably longer. The reason I’m doing so is that, almost unbelievably, there are still those who maintain that the coronavirus pandemic is “all in the mind”, that COVID-19 is no worse than the flu, and that this whole affair is overblown fear-mongering by those seeking to manufacture a non-existent “crisis”

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COVID-19: What can I, personally, do to help?

I think we’ve all read enough about the coronavirus pandemic to take it seriously.  We have no idea what the infection rate, survival rate, etc. are going to be, apart from broad parameters;  we can only go by the information available to us, and much of that information is suspect.  However, the trend is ominous.  (The statistics at the link will update daily;  the graphic below was accurate at the time of writing.) The powers that be are taking a pessimistic view, and implementing increasingly draconian measures to slow down the spread of the virus – no matter how disruptive those

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COVID-19: Update for March 13, 2020

Welcome to Friday the 13th, dear readers!  Here are a few useful links and tips concerning the coronavirus pandemic that I’ve gleaned over the past day or so. First, as most readers know, I was involved with law enforcement as a prison chaplain for a number of years.  I wrote a book about it a while back. In that capacity, I developed contacts with members of the FBI, US Marshals Service, and other agencies that I’ve maintained to this day.  I’m hearing interesting things from them about the supply of illegal drugs in our major metropolitan areas.  Basically, that supply is being

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COVID-19: Look after the small things you can control

The fear-mongering and panic stations concerning the current coronavirus epidemic are reaching fever pitch.  Politicians are accusing each other of failing to prepare for it;  pundits are bloviating every which way;  and alarums and excursions are the order of the day.  In the midst of all this folderol, we find ourselves rudderless.  Which way should we turn?  Whom should we believe?  What should we do? The short, simple answer is that we should do whatever is in our power and our control to do.  If something is beyond that – national health-care policy, hospital staffing and facilities, international implications – then why are we worrying ourselves about it? 

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COVID-19 and container imports – the cupboard is bare

OK, folks, this isn’t a news broadcast or a government statement.  This video was put up today by a truck driver at the Port of Los Angeles.  She shows us the real conditions on the ground at the container facility there, thanks to the coronavirus epidemic.  I’ll let her do the talking. If you buy much from stores that rely on Chinese products – stores like Walmart, Target, Harbor Freight, and many others – you can now see where they’re going to be a couple of months from now.  What’s in the supply pipeline right now – the containers that

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Bowie knives – what’s the best low-cost, high-value version?

I’ve had an interesting e-mail exchange with a friend over the past few days.  He wants to buy a Bowie-style knife, but he’s budget-limited, and furthermore isn’t a knife expert or aficionado in any way.  He wanted advice;  but I’m not an expert in the field, so I was limited in what I could suggest. We tossed ideas back and forth for a while, and came up with two sets of criteria.  The first is for the best budget Bowie knife;  low-cost, but high value-for-money in terms of quality, functionality, etc.  We set an arbitrary limit of fifty dollars as a maximum price. 

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COVID-19: Personal observations over the past couple of days

I continue to believe that the current “panic stations” response by many to the threat posed by the coronavirus epidemic is overblown.  Nevertheless, practical preparations are in order for most of us:  and the evidence that they’re needed is growing.  Here are just a few things I’ve personally observed over the past couple of days. Stocks of some China-sourced products are getting low, and stores are unable to tell me when they’ll receive new stocks.  Example:  I was in Sams Club yesterday morning, and heard a couple complain that the automotive department couldn’t supply a battery to fit their car. 

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