Sunday morning music

Here’s a work by a Finnish composer of whom I’d never heard until just the other day.  It’s the Third Symphony in F Major, Op. 40, composed by Erkki Melartin in 1907.  I find it reminiscent of Gustav Mahler’s work.  The four movements are: 1 – Allegro moderato 00:00 2 – Andante 09:08 3 – Scherzo (Vivacissimo) 18:19 4 – Largo 28:34   Interesting music, and a nice change of pace from last week’s rock memorial. Peter

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“I’ll take ‘Unlikely Movie Titles’ for $100, Alex”

I was doing some shopping on Amazon.com the other night.  To my utter astonishment, one of my search terms returned not only goods for sale, but also a short movie titled “Kung Fu Wizard of Jesus vs. Undead Robot Nazi Werewolves“.  A screen capture illustrating it looks like this: What’s more, it’s billed as a comedy!  I haven’t watched it, because my belief in Christ is an obstacle to making him an irreligious figure of fun.  Nevertheless, the title brings in so many tropes and story elements that it boggles the mind.  There’s even another film in the series titled

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Sunday morning music

This morning’s post is by way of a eulogy for Neil Peart, late drummer and lyricist for Canadian rock band Rush.  He died of brain cancer a few days ago. It’s almost impossible to praise too highly Peart’s contribution to rock music, and the role of percussion instruments in that genre.  He won no less than 38 awards from Modern Drummer magazine.  He won the “Best Rock Drummer” award every year from 1980-1986, and had to be taken off the nominee list and given his own emeritus mention, just so that others could have a chance at the title!  In his obituary, the magazine

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The deliberate murder of the Star Wars mythos

I’ve been as disgusted as anyone by the deliberate trashing of the Star Wars mythos by Disney’s final three movies in the franchise.  Their social-justice-warrior, liberal-progressive focus has been blindingly obvious, and box office results have confirmed that many fans have seen through the smokescreen to the reality beyond. Others have seen it as well.  Bill Whittle gave a concise breakdown of the scale of the problem in a recent video discussion that he called “The Unmaking of Star Wars: Why Progressives Killed It and How”.  I highly recommend it. John Nolte discusses “11 Ways Kathleen Kennedy Killed the ‘Star Wars’ Golden Goose“. To

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A grammatical relationship?

Stephan Pastis offers some grammatical advice to start the dating new year in the right fashion.  (Click the image to be taken to a full-size version at the comic’s Web page.) I can hear my old middle-school English teacher chuckling fiendishly at that one . . . Peter

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Sunday morning music

Here’s something rather different from our usual Sunday morning fare.  Two years ago today, in 2018, I put up a dialog from a Dungeons & Dragons game by Daddy Warpig.  It made me laugh, and amused a lot of my readers as well. I came across that post the other day, and laughed all over again.  It started me wondering . . . how much music is out there that was inspired by D&D?  A quick search on YouTube revealed dozens of songs, but most of them were very amateurish and not particularly funny.  One, however, caught my eye – this

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Saturday Snippet: a Viking hunting adventure

Readers seemed to like the snippet I posted from a proposed Viking/fantasy novel a couple of weeks ago:  so here’s another one.  The book is taking shape very quickly, and should be ready shortly. In this excerpt, the young Alvar (by now entering his teens) is hunting an elg, which is the Norwegian (and Viking) word for what we in North America call a moose.  A pund is a Viking measure of weight equalling approximately twelve US pounds:  a mark weighs approximately eight US ounces.      We happened upon the tracks of a large elg, following a narrow game trail through the forest.

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Will

I don’t think cartoonist Stephan Pastis is looking forward to the new year . . .  (Click the image to see a larger version at the cartoon’s Web page.) Peter

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Bob Gibson said…

Paolo Benedetto Bellinzani was an 18th-century Italian composer.  Not much of his output is remembered today, but his Sonata for Flute in D Minor is one of them.  It’s a light, pleasant piece that makes easy listening. I hope your post-Christmas digestion is recovering from the overload – just in time for the New Year celebrations next week! Peter

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