Hypocrisy, much?

The so-called “Extinction Rebellion” protests that have swept Europe in recent months came to Germany’s capital, Berlin, on Monday.  A camp was set up in a park to accommodate hundreds of protesters. Unfortunately for the holier-than-thou, “pure” Extinction Rebellion activists, who (among other things) are protesting the use of fossil fuels such as gasoline or diesel, the camp needed electricity.  Did they use batteries?  Like hell they did!  A Twitter user caught their hypocrisy on video, for all the world to see. Yes, that’s a generator!  They came to protest fossil fuels, among other things, and then proceeded to burn such fuels themselves so

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Bureaucrats and temperatures

There’s been a certain amount of hilarity hereabouts – not to mention anger – at the latest bureaucratic advice on how to deal with hot weather. The coolest temperature Americans should keep their thermostats set to is 78 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Energy Star, a federal program aimed at energy efficiency and cost savings for consumers. But many on social media do not agree with that recommendation. And social media users were even more vocal in objecting to Energy Star’s recommendation for nighttime thermostat settings. . . . Energy Star, a joint federal program run by the Department of Energy (DOE)

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So much for carbon dioxide and global warming!

I’m obliged to N4RFC.com for putting up this Australian video debunking the alleged role of carbon dioxide in global warming.  It illustrates, as nothing else does, the insanity – and outright lies – of those pushing this fraud.  It’s very short, and well worth watching. Next time someone wants to impose a “carbon tax”, show them that, and demand that they explain themselves. Peter

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The “California Tax” on all US motorists

Eric Peters points out the effect of California’s ecological dictates about vehicles on the rest of the country – particularly our wallets. California regulators have acquired de facto control over the cars you’re allowed to buy – even if you don’t live in California – by decreeing their own California-specific mileage and emissions standards. These end up having the force of national standards because the car industry – which wants to sell cars in California – can’t afford to build cars for just California and then another set of cars for the rest of the country. So they build all their cars to meet

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An old weed becomes a modern problem

The so-called “Sargasso Sea” in the North Atlantic Ocean is a time-honored name, dating back to well before Christopher Columbus’ day.  It may have been known as early as the sixth century BC, according to one ancient navigator‘s oral history.  The map below is courtesy of Wikipedia. Its name was derived from the sargassum seaweed that proliferates there.  In more recent times, the Sargasso Sea has become the heart of the so-called North Atlantic Garbage Patch. Now it looks as if sargassum is spreading south, into equatorial regions, and posing a new and highly unwelcome threat to the tourist industry in South America, the Caribbean,

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Sunday morning music

Time to ring the changes again.  I decided, on a whim, to look for songs with the word “black” in their titles.  I had no idea there were so many!  There’s certainly dozens, probably scores, and possibly hundreds of them out there.  That’s unmanageable:  so I decided to pick eight at random that I knew, and that I’d enjoyed when they came out.  (Yes, it makes me feel old to realize how many years I’ve accumulated since then!)  I’ve listed them in chronological order.  If you have another favorite, let us know about it in Comments, and post a link

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Sunday morning music

Let’s have a change of pace this morning. Back in 1994, Bill Whelan crafted “Riverdance” as an interval act during that year’s Eurovision Song Contest.  It received a standing ovation, which prompted its further development into a complete Celtic folk musical of the same name.  It became a smash hit all over the world.  The soundtrack album sold millions of copies. Here’s the night that started the whole phenomenon:  the original performance from the 1994 Eurovision Song Contest.  The solo dancers are the world-renowned Jean Butler and Michael Flatley, with choral backing by Anúna.  Subtitles give more information about the performance. When it was expanded into

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Sunday morning music

Those who don’t listen to it much often think of classical music as slow and stodgy, not very interesting.  That’s very far from the truth. Michael Praetorius (1571-1621) is best known for his sacred music, but he also produced “Terpsichore“, a compendium of 300-odd medieval and early Renaissance dances.  Here’s a 50-minute collection of several of them (not, as the video claims, a complete collection).  Some of them are quite rousing, and certainly foot-tapping even to those used to what’s laughably referred to as “dancing” in modern popular music. I think you’ll find some are very familiar to you, because they’ve

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Sunday morning music

For a complete change of pace, how about some music hall?  This was a mainstay of British entertainment in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and some of its songs and acts crossed the Atlantic to America as well.  Its songs were popular up to World War I, after which it morphed into variety shows and music.  Both were contemporaneous with musicals, and influenced (and were influenced by) them. There are so many songs from the music hall era that it’s impossible to list them all here.  (See this list of major British performers, just for a start!)  I’ve therefore selected just a few songs. 

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Are environmental concerns making the Nebraska floods worse?

I’m no hydrologist, but this article‘s claims about the current Nebraska floods sound plausible. The Master Water Control Manual is the bible of the Missouri River basin dam system.  It defines the duties and protocols to be followed in order to best meet the various needs represented in the list of priorities. From the completion of the dam construction (in 1967) until 2004, the Master Water Control Manual listed the priority functions in order of importance, with flood control being number one. 1) flood control 2) irrigation and upstream beneficial uses 3) downstream water supply 4) navigation and power 5) recreation and wildlife

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