A penetrating analysis by William S. Lind

William S. Lind is a well-known conservative commenter on US military affairs and geopolitics.  Many consider him rather “kooky”, and way off base, but even so, he often makes me think with some of his perspectives.  I don’t agree with all his positions, but I’m more than willing to tip my hat in his direction from time to time.In a recent article titled “Paradigm Shift“, he analyzes the almost hysterical reaction to President Trump’s meeting in Helsinki with Russian President Putin, and offers a thoughtful analysis of what’s behind it.  Here’s an excerpt, with its layout (but not its content) slightly

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A different view of President Trump’s election and the backlash against it

Courtesy of a link at Borepatch’s place, I found four articles analyzing the history of the Trump “insurgent campaign” for the presidency, and why the reaction against it – and him – from the progressive Left has been so overwhelming.  They provide additional details and insight that I haven’t found elsewhere. The author calls the series “The Kek Wars”.  The four parts are: Aristocracy and its Discontents   In the Shadow of the Cathedral   Triumph of the Frog God   What Moves In The Darkness To whet your appetite, here are the final two paragraphs of the last article in the

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Remembering the Vela Incident

Older readers may remember rumors of a nuclear explosion in the South Atlantic Ocean in 1979, which could not be verified at the time.  This became known as the Vela Incident.  A recent news report claims new evidence indicates that it was, indeed, a nuclear bomb. Ever since the flash was observed by a U.S. “Vela” satellite orbiting above Earth in September 1979, there’s been speculation that it was produced from a nuclear weapon test by Israel. . . . The flash was located in the area of Marion and Prince Edward islands, which are in the South Indian Ocean about halfway between

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The other side of the “tariff war” with China

There’s a great deal of talk in the news about the tariffs President Trump has imposed, and/or threatened to impose, on imports from China.  That’s an ongoing issue that isn’t likely to be resolved overnight.  However, it’s worth bearing in mind that, while the US economy overall is larger and stronger than the Chinese, that’s changing fast.One example is that General Motors has for some years sold more cars in China than it does in the United States.  Most recent figures, for the second quarter of 2018, show that GM sold 758,376 units here, and 858,344 in China.  That’s a difference of

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Another nail in the coffin of the Afghanistan campaign

It appears that Pakistan’s newly elected leader, Imran Khan, has a mind of his own when it comes to the US campaign in Afghanistan. I can’t say I blame him.  As I’ve said many times before in these pages (most recently just last week), there is no military solution possible in Afghanistan.  If that’s the case, why are we still fighting there?  Better to cut our losses and leave, rather than lose more American lives in a hopeless cause. Yes, there are those who’ll argue that by being there, we prevent other powers from moving into the vacuum that would be left

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We need to tread very carefully in the Middle East

I’m growing more and more concerned about the escalating conflict in Syria, particularly the war of words between the USA and Russia.  It seems pretty pointless to me from a US national security perspective.  Precisely what vital national security interest does the USA have in Syria, that would justify the deaths of US servicemen in a conflict there?  No-one has ever answered that question, as far as I know.  There’s been lots of waffling about “punishing Syrian President Assad for using chemical weapons against his own people”, but why is that a US national security interest?  The same goes for “countering Russian influence

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“The coming crime wars”

That’s the title of a very good article in Foreign Policy.  I can confirm its accuracy from extensive personal experience in the Third World.  Let’s begin with an excerpt. Wars are on the rebound. There are twice as many civil conflicts today, for example, as there were in 2001. And the number of nonstate armed groups participating in the bloodshed is multiplying. According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), roughly half of today’s wars involve between three and nine opposing groups. Just over 20 percent involve more than 10 competing blocs. In a handful, including ongoing conflicts in Libya

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The battle for the Internet in the third world

The Economist notes that US internet giants are squaring up to their Chinese counterparts, not so much in the USA and China as in the third world.  It calls the struggle “The most titanic commercial battle in the world“. Facing off are the towering giants of American and Chinese tech, led by the FAANGs (Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google’s parent, Alphabet) on one side and the BATs (Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent) on the other. These are some of the planet’s biggest firms, with a combined stockmarket capitalisation of more than $4trn. At play are some of its most promising

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Russian military tactics and operations in Ukraine

I’m obliged to Solomon for posting this video of a talk by Dr. Phillip Karber, given at West Point Military Academy, on “The Russian Way of War”.  It’s just over an hour long, and examines the conflict in Ukraine.  For those interested in the subject – particularly what US forces might have to face in a major confrontation – it’s very informative (not to mention deeply worrying, considering how many of the abilities exhibited by Russian forces have been ignored or allowed to atrophy by our own armed forces). Very thought-provoking.  Recommended. Peter

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