Sunday morning music, for the centenary of Armistice Day

One hundred years ago today, “on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918, fighting ended in the First World War with the implementation of an armistice.  Since then, 11th November has been celebrated all over the world, particularly in Britain and her former colonies, as Armistice Day.  The full peace treaty took many months more to negotiate, but at least the killing was over. It was one of the very worst, most destructive, and most pointless wars in the history of the world.  Untold millions died, or were maimed, or were hurt, yet their sacrifice

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Remember – and vote

Stephan Pastis reminds us: Today, use the right to vote that they died to bequeath to us. There are literally billions of people in the world who don’t have it, or whose right is meaningless thanks to official shenanigans. We don’t labor under that curse – so remember, give thanks, and vote. Peter

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Sunday morning music, for the centenary of Armistice Day

One hundred years ago today, “on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918, fighting ended in the First World War with the implementation of an armistice.  Since then, 11th November has been celebrated all over the world, particularly in Britain and her former colonies, as Armistice Day.  The full peace treaty took many months more to negotiate, but at least the killing was over. It was one of the very worst, most destructive, and most pointless wars in the history of the world.  Untold millions died, or were maimed, or were hurt, yet their sacrifice

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Remember – and vote

Stephan Pastis reminds us: Today, use the right to vote that they died to bequeath to us. There are literally billions of people in the world who don’t have it, or whose right is meaningless thanks to official shenanigans. We don’t labor under that curse – so remember, give thanks, and vote. Peter

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Floating drydocks, accidents, and ingenuity

The Russian aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov has been damaged during the sinking of a floating drydock.  It’s shown below in the dock before the undocking maneuver. The news reminds us, once again, that floating drydocks are enormously useful, but also potentially very hazardous.  They require very well-trained operators to partially submerge the dock, bring a ship into it and secure it to the dock, raise up the dock, and (after repairs are completed) submerge it again to let the vessel out.  The whole operation relies on pumping water into or out of various tanks along the length and breadth of the drydock.  Any

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I think these two have the right of it

I’ve previously made it clear that, despite possible missteps, I think President Trump was on the right track in dealing with Russia.  If you didn’t watch the video interview with him I posted over the weekend, I suggest you do so now, because it makes even more sense in the light of the clip below. Two US academics and foreign policy specialists, Stephen F. Cohen and John Mearsheimer, state bluntly that President Trump may be absolutely correct to blame many of the problems in our relationship with Russia on previous US administrations – and that he may be absolutely correct about the way forward. 

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A vintage Glock, no less!

I’m not a collector of older firearms for the sake of their age or antiquity.  My guns are shooters, plain and simple.  Nevertheless, I was surprised this morning when I dropped into my local gun shop, to inquire about a firearm I’ve got on back-order with them. The owner noticed I was wearing an older model Glock 17 on my hip, and asked to look at it.  When I handed it over, he did a double-take, and pointed out that I had a first-generation Glock.  It was manufactured sometime in the mid-1980’s, and must have been one of the very

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Updating your kitchen?

It wasn’t always so easy. Things have changed for the better, it seems!  When I was five years old, my parents bought a house that had been built at the turn of the 20th century.  It was in dire need of rehabbing, including the kitchen – which still contained a huge hollow at the base of a chimney, that was intended to accommodate a wood-fired or coal-fired stove and oven.  (With the chimney sealed off and sliding doors installed, it became a very useful cupboard.)  Thing is, when we moved in, it wasn’t too dissimilar to the old-style kitchen shown

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Maybe I should learn from Iceland . . .

Perhaps indie authors such as myself might consider drawing inspiration from an Icelandic translator of Bram Stoker’s famous horror novel ‘Dracula’. See, the Icelandic version of Dracula, what is called “Makt Myrkranna” or “Powers of Darkness”, isn’t a little different from the English version. It’s a LOT different. I’m not talking about the difference between the comic book Spider-Man and the movie Spider-Man; I’m talking about the difference between the comic book Spider-Man and Nelson Mandela. Somewhere along the line, the story we think we know got crossbred, vivisected, electroshocked, reanimated, and taught karate. And it’s awesome. First, the Count now

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