Concerning Michael Bloomberg and farmers

. . . which we’ve previously addressed here and here, I received this image over the weekend via e-mail (origin unknown). Makes sense to me.  When I look at the size of Michael Bloomberg’s fortune (over $60 billion, by all accounts), I have to ask how much “dirt” went into amassing so great an amount.  If it all happened without a single lapse in ethics or honesty, and entirely within the law, I’ll go out and buy a hat so that I can eat it! (Of course, the same applies to most large fortunes, irrespective of the political affiliations and/or ambitions of their

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“The Roots of Our Partisan Divide”

That’s the title of a long and very interesting article by Christopher Caldwell.  Basically, he argues that a culture of “civil rights” has usurped, and threatens to overthrow (and may perhaps already have overthrown) the constitutional foundation of our republic.  I’m going to quote from it at some length, in an attempt to capture the essence of his argument. But it is a third strand of the story, running all the way down to our day, that is most important for explaining our partisan polarization. It concerns how the civil rights laws of the 1960s, and particularly the Civil Rights Act of 1964, divided

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AG Barr, the Department of Justice and the coup attempt

James Howard Kunstler weighs in on the growing controversy over prosecutions (or the lack thereof) in the Department of Justice. You are forgiven for failing to follow all the twists and turns in this latest installment of what might now be called CoupGate, a summation of the seditious campaign to overthrow the president, which already has gone through so many gates — SpyGate, RussiaGate, MuellerGate, UkraineGate, WhistleblowerGate — that Mr. Trump looks like he’s spent three years training for the giant slalom in the next winter Olympics. A localized Civil War is underway in the Department of Justice now. Mr. Barr

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When civilized methods fail, the law of the jungle takes over

Adam Piggott points out that President Duterte of the Philippines may be a disaster from a modern, liberal, human-rights perspective, but he’s very popular among his people for precisely the same reason. Duterte has been in office for roughly the same time as Trump has been president, but we can call Duterte the forgotten man. When he first gained power the western press was all over him, how he was a horrible individual who was guilty of “human rights” abuses, blah blah blah, you know the drill. This went on for some time until suddenly it didn’t. From rather a lot of coverage

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How is it possible that California can’t provide a record of what it’s spent???

This simply boggles my mind.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. Just a few of the serious financial problems facing California include unfunded public employee pension promises, a potential state credit downgrade, an unprecedented homeless crisis, and a net out-migration of 912,000 residents since 2010. One easy step California can take is to join every other state in the union and open up its state checkbook for review. Allowing citizens, journalists, watchdogs, academics, and public policy experts to review state spending would help the state get its fiscal house in order. Unfortunately, last fall, California State Controller Betty Yee (pictured) rejected

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Potential for voter fraud? Oh, heck, yes .

Kudos to Judicial Watch for stepping up to the plate and continuing its investigation and activist intervention in states and counties that are not maintaining their voters rolls properly.  In a press release, the organization said: Judicial Watch announced today it is continuing its efforts to force states and counties across the nation to comply with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), by sending notice-of-violation letters to 19 large counties in five states that it intends to sue unless the jurisdictions take steps to comply with the law and remove ineligible voter registrations within 90 days. Section 8 of the National

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Doing greater harm by trying to do good?

I note that New York’s new discovery reform laws, which take effect on Wednesday, contain a double-edged provision that might threaten victims of crime. Have you ever made a call to 911 to report a crime? Next year if you do, your contact information will end up in the hands of the suspect police arrest. It’s a new reality of New York’s discovery reform laws taking effect just 12 days from now on January 1st. . . . Albany County District Attorney David Soares is dreading the conversations he knows we will have to have with crime victims. “By the way, I

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Frustrating Big Brother about firearms

We’re seeing more and more talk from the political extremes in the USA concerning imposing their views on others, or violently rejecting such attempts.  A good example may be found in Virginia right now.  A newly-elected Democrat majority is threatening to impose draconian restrictions on firearms rights, which has led to a backlash where almost 90% of the counties in the state have passed resolutions declaring themselves “Second Amendment sanctuary zones“, or words to that effect.  The language from both sides is becoming more heated, and I think there are serious implications for the future. (It’s also worth noting that the

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The Horowitz report: exposing the plot to overthrow a President

After the release of the Horowitz report last week, I’ve been waiting to see how the reactions shook out, and particularly what emerged after a thoughtful, careful analysis of what it revealed.  There’s been a lot of breathless hype, of course, and a great deal of partisan political pontification.  Nevertheless, as more and more information came out, there’s a growing anger and concern across the political spectrum as we’ve come to see how the “deep State” deliberately plotted to overthrow the result of a democratic election. I’ve put together seven articles that I thought made very important points about the report.  They’re from both sides

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The IG report’s whitewashing of the FBI is statistically unbelievable

Karl Denninger points out that a statistical analysis of the Inspector General’s report on the FBI investigation into President Trump reveals that it’s fundamentally impossible. The IG report, after reading through a good part of it, states that seventeen “errors” were made by the FBI. May I remind you of an indisputable fact: Errors are randomly distributed. That is, let’s assume you intend to drive at 40mph.  If you make an error you will operate your car some of the time at 38mph, and some of the time at 42mph.  The errors, if they are actual errors, will be randomly distributed around the correct action.  Some of the errors will

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