Close-range air-to-air footage of the Sukhoi Su-57

Russia’s attempt to produce a fifth-generation fighter, the Sukhoi Su-57, has apparently not been too successful in technical terms;  the aircraft is reputedly not nearly as “stealthy” as it needs to be when measured against the US F-22 Raptor.  Also, Russia has announced that it won’t put the aircraft into mass production, probably because it can’t afford it in large numbers.  Nevertheless, it’s probably a pretty capable “Generation 4½” fighter, and a dozen will be built for the Russian Air Force. Recently an air-to-air photo shoot was held for the Su-57.  An Antonov An-12transport (similar to the US C-130 Hercules) was the camera plane.  It

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Storms, and a bleg

Pitsnipes Gripes (warning:  site content is sometimes NSFW) has a fascinating postcontaining GIF (i.e. animated) photographic sequences of storms.  Here’s one to whet your appetite. There are many more at the link.  Recommended viewing.  Click on each image for a larger view. Also, I need to ask a favor of my readers.  My “Cochrane’s Company” trilogy is now fully published, with the first book coming out in May, the second in June, and the final volume earlier this month. As I write these words, the review count is as follows: Volume 1, “The Stones of Silence” – 64 reader reviews Volume 2,

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That’s a heck of a ride!

Hawaiian surfer Koa Smith was in just the right place at exactly the right time to ride the wave of his life – and the whole thing was caught on video from two unique angles. Perched precariously on his surfboard, the 23-year-old from Hawaii rode a wave off the coast of Namibia, on the western shore of Africa, for 120 straight seconds. He stayed upright for nearly a mile (1.6 kilometers) as he traveled through an unheard-of eight barrels – the hollow formed by the curve of the wave as it breaks over the rider’s head. Almost as amazing, Smith and videographer

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One sees why they design submarines with that shape

Courtesy of Daily Timewaster, we find this beautiful picture of an orca (killer whale)cutting through the water.  Note how the liquid flows around its smooth, streamlined body.  Click the image for a larger view. One begins to understand why modern submarine hulls are similarly streamlined. That’s a great photograph. I’d love to know how it was taken: from what sort of platform, how far away, and so on. Peter

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Bicycles as you’ve never seen them before

It seems Chinese cities are clogged with hundreds of thousands of bikes-for-rent that no-one wants to rent, and which have therefore been abandoned.  Yahoo has a photo essay about them that’s fascinating.  Up close, they’re just junked bicycles . . . . . . but when photographed from afar, after being sorted into like colors, etc., they look just like fields of weird flowers. Click either image for a larger version.  There are many more photographs at the original article.  Open each in a new tab or window for a bigger view. French-born photographer Mathias Guillin, 49, lives and works in Shanghai —

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What a great photograph!

I came across this photograph on Gab.  It shows a stream of molten lava landing on a black sand beach, presumably in Hawaii, where volcanic eruptions continue.  Click the image for a larger view. I’d love to know whether that was taken by a human photographer, or a drone.  I presume the latter, because any human getting that close to a stream of molten lava is asking for trouble!  However it was taken, though, that’s a fascinating image.  Kudos to whoever took it. Peter

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The Sun as a ribbon in the sky

NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day yesterday was this lovely image of the Sun’s analemma over Scotland during the past year. You can read more about it at the link. Also eye-catching is this video, courtesy of Daily Timewaster, showing four-year time-lapse footage of the explosion of star V838 Monocerotis between 2002 and 2006.  Watch it in full-screen mode for maximum impact. Things like that remind us of how truly insignificant humanity is, on a galactic and universal scale.  We aren’t even a speck of dust by comparison. Peter

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Some amazing wildlife photographs

Britain’s world-famous Natural History Museum has just released the results of its 2018 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.  There are some spectacular images.  Here are just two, to whet your appetite.  Click each one for a much larger view. The winner in the category “Animals in their Environment”, from Spain, is Cristobal Serrano with a drone-captured overhead picture of crabeater seals on an ice floe.  (Oddly enough, despite their name, they don’t eat crabs!) Highly commended in the category “Animal Portraits”, here’s a lioness captured by Isak Pretorius of South Africa. There are many more photographs at the link.  Highly recommended viewing.

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