Good question, Chicago!

Chicago politicians have consistently blamed the “flood” of guns coming in from outside for the incredibly high figures for gun crime in that city.  That’s nonsense, of course, but they continue to parrot the same old excuse.  Just days ago, Mayor Lightfoot got into a Twitter spat with Senator Ted Cruz on the subject. I think the problem is nicely summed up in this meme, that I found over at Chief Nose Wetter‘s place. Good question, Ms. Mayor!  Let’s hear your answer! Peter

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If we won’t help, why should police protect and serve us?

George Orwell said, in so many words: People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf. Those “rough men” aren’t only soldiers.  Police fit that description too, and are indispensable in any modern society.  However . . . if the society for and within which they work won’t support them, why should they “stand ready” on its behalf? That’s a question law enforcement officers in California must be asking themselves today. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill striking down a law that makes it a crime to refuse a police officer’s

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Liberal arts degrees still have a place – but only if they’re “real” degrees

I was struck by this article at CNBC, not only for its positive points, but for what it misses.  It’s a case of “close, but no cigar“. By investing in liberal arts graduates, we gain people with human-centered skills who can approach problems in entirely new ways, contributing to out-of-the-box thinking in a digital age. Liberal arts graduates bring a depth and breadth of knowledge from across the humanities and social sciences that complement the hard skills of engineers and data scientists. And in a world that increasingly interacts with technology in every facet of daily life, it’s increasingly important that technology

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“Social and emotional learning” – but by whose standards?

Over at Mad Genius Club this morning, I consider proposals to “establish social and emotional learning as a priority in education”.  I find them rather frightening, to put it mildly.  Here’s an excerpt from that article. My problem is this.  It looks very much as if CASEL is trying to “homogenize” our youth, teaching them the One True Way to deal with life issues, and inculcating a standard set of responses that ignore individuality and “program” them to deal with life, the universe and everything according to whatever approach is politically correct at the moment.  (Read more about it at their

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When ethics and morals drive corporate governance

Many corporations appear to be rethinking their role in society, and in the process losing their focus on the original reason(s) for their existence. The purpose of a corporation is to serve all of its constituents, including employees, customers, investors and society at large, the Business Roundtable said Monday in a statement. Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co., heads the group. “While each of our individual companies serves its own corporate purpose, we share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders,” the group said in the statement. “Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through

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Quote of the day – gun control edition

The usual suspects are coming up with the same tired old ideas to implement gun control, usually incrementally, so we don’t see confiscation creeping up on us.  It’s a game as old as the hills, and it’ll go on as long as the hills are there. One idea being advanced (again) as part of a “Green New Deal for Guns” is a gun buyback program, this time mandatory rather than voluntary.  Of course, it’s logically nonsensical;  how can the government (or anyone else) buy back a gun that was never theirs in the first place?  However, logic has never stopped a gun-grabber. 

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A snappy answer to a stupid question

As usual after any mass shooting tragedy, the anti-gunners have been spouting their propaganda once more, including the tired old canard “Who needs a 100-round magazine?”  It makes for a cute sound bite, but has little or nothing to do with reality – particularly because most shooters can change magazines pretty quickly when necessary (as we’ll see below), rendering the question moot. Congressional representative Thomas Massie of Kentucky had a great answer to that question. Nicely put, sir! I don’t have any very-large-capacity magazines for my rifles, because I’ve found too many cases where they jam or cause problems.  That’s not to say there

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