Reduce the housing shortage by . . . making home ownership more costly???

One wonders whether the San Diego City Council has ever heard the expression, “a contradiction in terms”.  Its housing policy appears to exemplify it. A San Diego committee took a preliminary step Wednesday toward placing a $900 million housing bond on the November 2020 ballot. . . . The measure was designed to help San Diego secure a greater share of state money devoted to homelessness and affordable housing by providing local matching funds typically required for such assistance. Supporters say evidence the bond is necessary includes city estimates that San Diego needs more than 5,400 additional housing units geared for homeless

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Fanatics, politics, and one-track minds

As I’ve said many times, I’m neither Republican nor Democrat, neither left-wing nor right-wing.  I have my own views on life, the universe and everything, shaped and formed through some pretty eventful experiences, and I don’t expect anyone else to subscribe to them. Nevertheless, I try to understand what both wings of politics are going on about.  That’s particularly important when neither side seems willing to compromise in any respect whatsoever.  The Z man addresses this as observed on the left wing of politics.  Can the same be said of at least some of those on the right? Being on the Left

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Terrorist chickens coming home to roost?

A few weeks ago, I noted that ISIS terrorists imprisoned in the Kurdish areas of Syria were caught between a rock and a hard place. Syrian security forces are also helping to round up or kill any ISIL prisoners who had recently escaped from Kurdish prisons. Everyone involved here, especially the Syrians, Iranians and Iraqis, have a compelling reason to prevent ISIL members or family members from getting free. The Kurds had asked, without much success, for more help, especially financial, to deal with all the ISIL personnel they had captured. Moslem and non-Moslem nations were not eager to take back their

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Bureaucrats don’t like non-compliant, rebellious serfs

The Foundation for Economic Education highlights how bureaucrats weaponize the child protection system against parents wanting to protect their children from increasingly dysfunctional schools. Schooling is adept at rooting out individuality and enforcing compliance. In his book, Understanding Power, Noam Chomsky writes: “In fact, the whole educational and professional training system is a very elaborate filter, which just weeds out people who are too independent, and who think for themselves, and who don’t know how to be submissive, and so on—because they’re dysfunctional to the institutions.” This filtering process begins very early in a child’s schooling as conformity is rewarded and divergence

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In memoriam: Harold Bloom

An academic legend has left us.  Prof. Harold Bloom died earlier this month.  The New York Times offers a lengthy obituary. Professor Bloom was frequently called the most notorious literary critic in America. From a vaunted perch at Yale, he flew in the face of almost every trend in the literary criticism of his day. Chiefly he argued for the literary superiority of the Western giants like Shakespeare, Chaucer and Kafka — all of them white and male, his own critics pointed out — over writers favored by what he called “the School of Resentment,” by which he meant multiculturalists, feminists,

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Crime, reform, and partisan politics

It looks like the administration in Seattle is doing a terrible job of controlling crime in that city.  Two reports by local business associations highlight the problems they’re facing as a result. I’m obliged to the good people at Bearing Arms for putting together this summary of the situation. I’ll quote it at length, because it deserves attention – and it’s symptomatic of the situation in so many of our larger cities at present. In fact, in Seattle, crimes like rape, homicide, and aggravated assaults are the highest recorded in over a decade … A new report commissioned by business associations in Seattle reveals that

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Hypocrisy, much?

The so-called “Extinction Rebellion” protests that have swept Europe in recent months came to Germany’s capital, Berlin, on Monday.  A camp was set up in a park to accommodate hundreds of protesters. Unfortunately for the holier-than-thou, “pure” Extinction Rebellion activists, who (among other things) are protesting the use of fossil fuels such as gasoline or diesel, the camp needed electricity.  Did they use batteries?  Like hell they did!  A Twitter user caught their hypocrisy on video, for all the world to see. Yes, that’s a generator!  They came to protest fossil fuels, among other things, and then proceeded to burn such fuels themselves so

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Money is the problem, not the solution

I noted with some cynicism an article in Rolling Stone titled “Why Can’t California Solve Its Housing Crisis?”  Here’s a brief excerpt. Google recently pledged $1 billion to help ease the Bay Area’s housing crunch — but that sum is only eye-popping until you hear experts explain it would cost $14 billion to execute the company’s vision of building 20,000 homes. Google’s is a well-intentioned gesture, but one that illustrates how the problem facing the Bay Area, and California at large, is much worse than even its brightest minds can comprehend. . . . Four years ago, Liccardo set a

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The impending death of the last shreds of our privacy?

Two reports have made me seriously wonder whether ordinary people care any longer about the last shreds of privacy remaining to them. The first report, ” Silicon Valley’s final frontier for mobile payments — ‘the neoliberal takeover of the human body’ “, examines the use of physical features and attributes as a payment mechanism. Biometric mobile wallets – payment technologies using our faces, fingerprints or retinas – already exist.  Notable technology companies including Apple and Amazon await a day when a critical mass of consumers is sufficiently comfortable walking into a store and paying for goods without a card or device …

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This one’s for Larry Correia

After Larry’s fulminations against Mike Glyer and File 770, it seems that progressive loony-left agitators are reporting anything and everything he says on Facebook as a breach of that platform’s code of conduct, resulting in multiple bans.  This doesn’t exactly worry him – he’s got hundreds of thousands of his own followers who couldn’t care less what Facebook thinks – but it’s frustrating, nonetheless. Anyway, I thought I’d cheer Larry up by posting yesterday’s Pearls Before Swine cartoon strip.  I think it sums up the situation very nicely.  Click the image to go to a larger version of the cartoon on its

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