Voter fraud?

Midterm election results in California are looking more and more suspicious. Orange County, a conservative area just south of Los Angeles, California turned all blue after Democrats produced hundreds of thousands of votes weeks after election day using a practice known as “ballot harvesting.”. . .Precinct 38083 in Orange County, California had a 120% turnout – 465 registered voters and 561 ballots cast in this precinct.Other numbers don’t add up in Orange County either and The Gateway Pundit has been reporting on this for weeks.October 22nd totals for voter registration there show 541,665 (R) and 523,624 (D) yet totals from Election

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Cult nation?

I’m very familiar with religious cults, from a professional perspective (as a former pastor and chaplain) and from counseling those trapped in them, trying to help them break free.  I’ve seen signs of cult-like behavior on the extremes of the American political spectrum, but I’ve never consciously equated the two fields.  Now the Federalist makes the resemblance clear. Consider for a moment today’s culture, which is saturated with the constant agitation of political correctness. It rarely allows for any real discussion or debate without automatic vilification of those deemed politically incorrect. Sadly, this is especially true in the very place where there

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The party of the rich is . . . ?

I note that the recent mid-term elections have produced one interesting result that hasn’t received much comment. California, New Jersey, New York and Virginia dominated the top 10 wealthiest congressional districts. Out of the wealthiest 50 districts, 13 are located in California; eight are in New York; five in New Jersey; and four in Virginia. Massachusetts, which didn’t make the top 10, still sports four of the nation’s richest congressional districts.Here are the 10 richest congressional districts in the U.S. by median household income:. . .Among the top 10 richest congressional districts, Democrats now represent all 10. Out of the 50 richest

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“Seizing property before it can escape”

Back in May, we looked at a proposal to use property taxes to pay off Illinois’ and Chicago’s pension deficit.  In particular, its advocates noted: The tax would be capitalized into real estate values which would prevent people leaving the state to avoid paying for the liability. It looks like Chicago and its satellite communities may be about to implement that progressive wet-dream tax. They figured out a way to tax wealthy folks trying to flee Illinois: A progressive real estate transfer tax, and the idea seems to be getting popular.. . .Chicago today has a real estate transfer tax of $5.25 per

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The tenuously United States of America

Yesterday’s mid-term elections have highlighted one factor in particular:  the fact that the United States are only barely united, with many influences dividing her people.  A big part of that divide is urban versus rural;  people in the latter areas appear to be far more conservative and “traditional” than those in the former.  Since cities are growing at the expense of smaller towns and the countryside, that divide is going to favor them to an ever-increasing extent . . . but what about the rest of the country?  Can urban voters override rural ones, and expect to get away with

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Pakistan: the epicenter of instability in South Asia?

Strategy Page points out that Pakistan’s own internal instability is destabilizing South Asian nations around it.  It’s not a hopeful picture for US involvement in Afghanistan. Imran Khan, the newly elected prime minister of Pakistan, has proved himself very much a tool of the Pakistani military. Khan openly and enthusiastically supports the Islamic terrorist violence in Indian Kashmir and denies any Pakistani responsibility for it. The Pakistani military can now do whatever they like without any risk of criticism from Pakistani politicians. The new head of the ISI is noted for his enthusiastic support for Islamic radicalism and the use of Islamic

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Remember – and vote

Stephan Pastis reminds us: Today, use the right to vote that they died to bequeath to us. There are literally billions of people in the world who don’t have it, or whose right is meaningless thanks to official shenanigans. We don’t labor under that curse – so remember, give thanks, and vote. Peter

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The tenuously United States of America

Yesterday’s mid-term elections have highlighted one factor in particular:  the fact that the United States are only barely united, with many influences dividing her people.  A big part of that divide is urban versus rural;  people in the latter areas appear to be far more conservative and “traditional” than those in the former.  Since cities are growing at the expense of smaller towns and the countryside, that divide is going to favor them to an ever-increasing extent . . . but what about the rest of the country?  Can urban voters override rural ones, and expect to get away with

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