So much for the evil, racist, bitter-clinger gun nuts of Richmond!

Photographs taken at today’s demonstration against Second Amendment restrictions in Richmond, Virginia.  All are sourced from various Web sites, and have been posted multiple times, so I don’t know their origin.  If anyone took them and wants them removed, or a copyright acknowledgment, I’ll be glad to comply.           And did you notice how much of the left-wing mainstream media went dead silent on the subject, as soon as it became clear that the protesters were basically decent, law-abiding citizens protesting legislative overreach?  They wanted to blare banner headlines about racists and white nationalists – few, if any

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“There’s more than one way to skin a cat” – illegal alien edition

The headline is an old saying from the 19th century that I still enjoy.  It’s still valid, in almost every walk of life.  President Trump has just illustrated that in dealing with the invasion of this country by illegal aliens. Donald Trump’s policies to deal with the crisis on our southern border are working as intended. Mark Morgan, acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection commissioner, says that daily apprehensions of illegal aliens have fallen from about 4,000 at the height of the crisis to around 1,300 now. What’s more, the 21-day average is less than 1,000 — a 78 percent drop over the

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The great inversion: “deplorables” versus intellectuals

Eric S. Raymond wrote a very thought-provoking article a few weeks ago, analyzing how socialist and Marxist ideology has moved its support base from workers to intellectuals in both the UK and the USA.  Here are a few excerpts. There’s a political trend I have been privately thinking of as “the Great Inversion”. It has been visible since about the end of World War II in the U.S., Great Britain, and much of Western Europe, gradually gaining steam and going into high gear in the late 1970s. . . . To understand the Great Inversion, we have to start by remembering what

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“Unsalvageable” humans?

An article in Taki’s Magazine refers to some human beings as “The Unsalvageables“.  Here’s an excerpt. Some of you might remember Anthony Stokes. He was a 15-year-old DeKalb County, Ga., hood rat with a bum ticker who kept getting passed over for a heart transplant because of his “high risk” lifestyle, which included burglary, weapons charges, arson, and neglecting to take his prescribed meds. Seeing how donor hearts aren’t found on trees (or in Dollar Trees), doctors were reluctant to give a young crime lord in training one of the precious organs. So Anthony’s granmoms or auntie or whoever the hell

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“What would happen in an apocalyptic blackout

That’s the question asked by the BBC in a very interesting analysis of how dependent we are on electricity for our very survival in urban areas.  It looks at Venezuela’s real-life experience of prolonged blackouts, and extrapolates from that to the situation in most major cities.  Here’s an excerpt to show you the scale of the problem. In our modern world, almost everything, from our financial systems to our communication networks, are utterly reliant upon electricity. Other critical infrastructure like water supplies and our sewer systems rely upon electric powered pumps to keep them running. With no power, fuel pumps at petrol

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After the “Arab Spring”, a Middle East in turmoil

The Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs has released a comprehensive analysis of the “state of play” a decade after the Arab Spring revolutions and uprisings across the Middle East.  It makes sobering reading – and illustrates the vacuum within which terror groups like ISIS and rogue states like Iran are operating, and why they could (and still do) literally get away with murder. The analysis summarizes its findings in five main points.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. Today, the Middle East is a combination of confused Arab nation-states that have shown their weakness and incapacity to contain the Iranian threat. The

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Be the Indian, not the buffalo!

Matt Bracken has written a thoughtful, insightful essay about the coming anti-gun-control protests planned for Virginia later this month.  Let me say at once that I endorse what he has to say.  I think the potential for really serious trouble is very great;  and I think the new authorities in that state will exploit such trouble(s) for all they’re worth to further their anti-gun agenda. Matt writes (bold, underlined text is my emphasis): The more I ponder the mass demonstration being promoted by the Virginia Citizens Defense League for the annual Lobby Day at the Richmond Capitol, the more it looks like

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An American dystopia – but is it deliberate?

There’s an old military saying that you’ve seen in these pages before.  “Once is happenstance;  twice is coincidence;  three or more times is enemy action.”  It’s often attributed to Ian Fleming, from his James Bond novel “Goldfinger”, but it’s far older than that.  I’ve seen similar sentiments expressed in eighteenth-century writings.  Basically, it means that if the same thing happens, with similar results, too many times, it’s not accidental or coincidental.  Instead, someone’s out to get you, and you need to do something serious about them before they do. I find myself repeating that saying when I consider the catastrophic

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Potential for voter fraud? Oh, heck, yes .

Kudos to Judicial Watch for stepping up to the plate and continuing its investigation and activist intervention in states and counties that are not maintaining their voters rolls properly.  In a press release, the organization said: Judicial Watch announced today it is continuing its efforts to force states and counties across the nation to comply with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), by sending notice-of-violation letters to 19 large counties in five states that it intends to sue unless the jurisdictions take steps to comply with the law and remove ineligible voter registrations within 90 days. Section 8 of the National

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On Iran, the Romans had it right

I’m sure many of my readers are familiar with the later Roman Empire’s famous dictum, “Si vis pacem, para bellum” (“If you want peace, prepare for war”).  It’s derived from Vegetius‘ classic fourth-century text, De re militari (“Concerning Military Matters”). It’s particularly apt to consider that reality when thinking of the targeted killing of Iranian general Qasem Soleimani by US forces in Iraq.  Soleimani was the leading terrorist organizer and controller in the entire Middle East, head and shoulders above all others in power, influence, intellect and ability.  The West had tippy-toed its way around him and his Iranian backers for decades.  President Trump finally

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