Quite so

This XKCD cartoon caught my eye. Go to the original to read the mouseover text. I’ve never understood why horror films exist at all.  When one’s seen enough real-life horror, the movie imitation thereof is merely a reminder of things one would much rather forget – in fact, which one would much rather never have seen at all. Comedy horror, on the other hand, is a horse of a different color.  Who can forget “Love At First Bite“? And then there’s the famous thread on The Firing Line, started by our own Lawdog, titled “Lines I’d like to hear in a horror movie someday“. 

Continue reading

Politically correct – but it ignores the facts

I note that the late Matthew Shepard is to be reinterred. For 20 years, the ashes of Matthew Shepard have not been laid to rest. Mr. Shepard’s killing in 1998, when he was a 21-year-old college student, led to national outrage and, almost overnight, turned him into a symbol of deadly violence against gay people. Mourners flocked to his funeral that year in Casper, Wyo., but there were also some protesters, carrying derogatory signs. Mr. Shepard’s parents worried that if they chose a final resting place for their son, it would be at risk of desecration. Now they have found a safe place.

Continue reading

“Choking On the Salt of Debt”

That’s the title of a very thought-provoking article at Acting Man.  We’ve spoken about the perils of debt, and the damage it’s doing to our economy, on several occasions.  This article puts a new perspective on the problem, and highlights how bad it’s become.  I only have space to quote a few paragraphs from the author’s extensive treatment of the subject, which you should read in full. Debt based stimulus is both sustaining and killing the economy at the same time.  No doubt, this is a ridiculous situation.  Here we will look to California’s San Joaquin Valley for parallels… . . . In the San

Continue reading

California’s public sector unions, money, and politics

The California Political Review calculates the money taken in every year by public sector unions in that state, and shows how it gives those unions a powerful say in the running of the state. In the wake of the Janus ruling, it is useful to estimate just how much money California’s government unions collect and spend each year. Because government unions publicly disclose less than what the law requires of public corporations or private sector unions, only estimates are possible. . . . In summary, subject to the limitations in the available data and what appear to be reasonable assumptions,

Continue reading

Welfare and immigration: a contradiction in terms

Karl Denninger points out the fundamental incompatibility between immigration and a welfare state. Fundamentally-incompatible things can be serious trouble. Put gasoline in your diesel-fueled vehicle and see what happens.  Or the converse. Drink a bunch and then go operate some sort of machinery.  The outcome is likely to be very bad. Welfare in general — where you are given a right to take from someone else by force something you want but have not earned — is incompatible with a lot of things. One of the things it’s incompatible with is an “open border”. This is math, not politics.  America

Continue reading

Note the lie in the headline

An article at CNBC caught my eye yesterday, particularly because the headline – and the body of the article – contain a blatant, out-and-out lie, designed to con the consumer. Homeowners are sitting on a record amount of cash – and not tapping it U.S. homeowners today are getting richer by the minute, but they are less likely to cash in on their newfound wealth than during previous housing booms. As home values rise, home equity lines of credit, often used to tap home equity, are flatlining, and the overall amount of money people are taking out of their homes

Continue reading

A nightmare for parents, and a sobering lesson

A home invasion robbery in Texas had ghastly consequences for one family, particularly their seven-year-old son. The homeowner told police that three masked black suspects broke through the front door and pistol-whipped him, causing injuries. “This is the worst kind of crime against a family,” Sheriff Troy Nehls said. “Three crooks forcing their way into a home in the middle of the night is appalling. To make matters worse, they accosted a 7-year-old child. They’re cowards, to say the least.” Nehls said the father kept telling the intruders there was no money and to take jewelry or a car, but

Continue reading

Know your enemy #1: The violent “progressives”

It helps when the enemy defines him- or herself, so that we know at whom to aim. Do you think that being asked to leave a restaurant, or having your meal interrupted, or being called by the public is bad? My fascism-enabling friends, this is only the beginning. . . . Rather than detail a laundry list of all the Trump outrages, I ask you simply to consider all of the very real human costs that those outrages have already inflicted on human beings in America and abroad. Some of those outrages, like ripping families apart at the border, show

Continue reading

Chain migration’s effect on one Pennsylvania town

City Journal recently published an in-depth article about the effect of chain migration on Hazelton, Pennsylvania.  It’s a startling and eye-opening piece of journalism.  Here’s a lengthy excerpt.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. With a population long dominated by the descendants of European immigrants, Hazleton has been radically transformed since the early 2000s by secondary chain migration, principally driven by Dominicans—immigrants, both legal and illegal, as well as second- and third-generation citizens arriving from the New York metropolitan area. In 2000, Hispanics made up less than 5 percent of Hazleton’s population; they now account for more than 50 percent.

Continue reading