Marriage and the “loaf of bread test”

I was pleased to read an Australian article offering a fresh perspective on what makes a good, sound relationship.  It may seem trite, but it echoes what I used to say to couples in marriage counseling (as a pastor) for many years. The Loaf of Bread Test was unwittingly invented by the husband of a friend. He made sandwiches for my friend and himself. There wasn’t much bread left so he made his sandwich with the crusts and gave her the good slices. It was such a tiny gesture — mundane even. It’s not Insta-worthy, you wouldn’t put it on Facebook and

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Day 5 on the road: to North Carolina

Following a productive visit to Dayton, Miss D. and I hit the road on Thursday morning, and turned south towards North Carolina.  After a period of heavy traffic making our way through the Cincinnati metroplex and across the Kentucky border, we settled down to a steady pace on what was probably the most enjoyable day on the road of this trip so far.  The roads through Kentucky were generally pretty good, the traffic was bearable, and the weather was enjoyable. All went smoothly until we passed through Knoxville, TN.  Google Maps warned us of a couple of slowdowns ahead, one quite small

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The medical profession and a broken heart

In his highly entertaining (if chemically and scientifically esoteric) book “Excuse Me Sir, Would You Like to Buy a Kilo of Isopropyl Bromide?“, chemical engineer and industrial chemist Max Gergel starts out by describing his university studies, and his (frequently unsuccessful) romantic endeavors, during World War II.  In one incident, he describes the breakup of a relationship he’d taken far more seriously than the lady concerned.  So upset was he, both physically and mentally, that he sought a doctor’s advice. Dr. Silver was an unusual man. He did not prescribe medicine; he gave shots. These were ordered from outside the city. They

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Heh

This was sent in by several readers.  It made me chuckle. From the spelling of “humour” and the acronym RSPCA, I suspect this was an item in an English newspaper about an American news report. Still, it’s funny in any language and any nation. Peter

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Be my anti-Valentine?

Two news reports bring a new twist to Valentines Day.  The first is from Oregon. “Did you fall hook, line, and sinker for someone who broke your heart?” the Wildlife Images Rehabilitation & Education Center asked in its promotion. “Kodi & Yak would love to help you get your revenge!” For a $20 donation, the animal rehab center will name a salmon after the ex of your choosing and feed it to their bears, send you a certificate and photos of Kodi and Yak enjoying the salmon named after your former love. There’s more at the link. In similar vein, here’s one from England.

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The Cardinal is partly right

There’s been predictable outrage at a German Cardinal’s assertion that homosexuality, rather than the Catholic Church, is responsible for the plague of priest child sexual abuse cases. “What has happened in the church is no different from what is happening in society as a whole,” Cardinal Walter Brandmüller said. “The real scandal is that the Catholic church hasn’t distinguished itself from the rest of society.” A study commissioned by the German Bishops Conference and published last year found that more than 3,600 children were sexually abused by Catholic clergy in Germany between 1946 and 2014. But Cardinal Brandmüller claimed that only a

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This looks far too good to eat

Seen on Gab this morning: Traditional wedding bread of #Ukraine called Korovai has ancient origins & comes from pagan belief in magical properties of grain. Korovai was a large round braided bread, traditionally baked from wheat flour & decorated w/symbols, such as suns, moons, birds, animals & pine cones. That’s astonishing!  I’d never heard of korovai before, but Wikipedia has a lengthy article about it. The bread was traditionally prepared in the home of the bride by women who sang traditional songs to guide them through the making. These women were called the korovainytsi (pol. korowajnice), and were most often invited in odd numbers to do the job of

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(Departed) soul mates???

This is one of the more unusual relationship breakup stories to pop up. An Irish Jack Sparrow impersonator who married the ghost of a pirate has revealed she has split from her 300-year-old hubby. Earlier this year Amanda Sparrow Large, 46, said she’d found her “soulmate” in a Haitian pirate from the 1700s who was executed for thieving on the high seas. The loved-up couple were legally married by a shaman priest in a boat off the Irish coast in international waters. But now the mum from Drogheda, Co Louth, has revealed the unlikely union is over. Posting on social media

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