Should we treat pornography like an epidemic? A growing body of evidence suggests that’s what it is.

A very long and detailed article titled “A Science-Based Case for Ending the Porn Epidemic” examines what pornography has done to our society, particularly since the rise of the Internet.  It makes a strong case that pornography is a public health crisis, not just an issue of morality. I’ve included a few brief excerpts from the article here, but it’s far longer and more detailed than I can summarize in a blog article such as this.  I urge you to click through and read the whole thing for yourself.  I’m sure some of my readers will disagree with its conclusions; 

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The Superbowl, sex, and society

Like millions of other Americans, I watched Super Bowl 54 last night.  The game itself was good, with two teams going at it for all they were worth.  Since I didn’t have a favorite to support, I was able to enjoy the game overall, and support the sport rather than a tribal favorite participant.  The Kansas City Chiefs won, but that was only clinched in the last quarter of the game.  Up until then, their opponents, the San Francisco 49ers, could have won as well – both teams were very evenly matched.  Congratulations to both sides. What really saddened me – and

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When birth certificates become a public safety issue

The law of unintended consequences appears to have struck again, this time in Colorado, where anyone can apply to have their birth certificate amended to change the record of their biological sex at birth. If governmental policy allows IDs to contain false, misleading, confusing, or unverified information, a chain reaction of adverse societal consequences will result. Those formerly comfortable in relying on the information disclosed in IDs will be compelled to undertake their own costly, time-consuming, and difficult investigations in order to verify the true nature of the person presenting an ID. . . . Inability to rely on the accuracy of the

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A grammatical relationship?

Stephan Pastis offers some grammatical advice to start the dating new year in the right fashion.  (Click the image to be taken to a full-size version at the comic’s Web page.) I can hear my old middle-school English teacher chuckling fiendishly at that one . . . Peter

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An oldie, but still funny as heck

I noticed this video at the Feral Irishman’s place the other day.  I posted it on this blog back in 2016, but it made me laugh all over again to see it once more:  so I thought you might enjoy it again, too. Somehow I don’t think that relationship lasted . . . Peter

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Restoring marriage

The problems inherent in marriage are discussed in an article at National Review.  The excerpt below highlights many of the issues they discuss, and I’ve highlighted one paragraph in bold, underlined text for further discussion. Who or what is to blame for this unraveling of marriage and the complete breakdown of trust in Rob’s world, and in the world of so many white, working-class people like him? Economic instability is most immediately evident … Less visible but more dramatic is the role of social alienation. At least two generations have now come of age in the aftermath of the divorce revolution, and

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Marriage and the “loaf of bread test”

I was pleased to read an Australian article offering a fresh perspective on what makes a good, sound relationship.  It may seem trite, but it echoes what I used to say to couples in marriage counseling (as a pastor) for many years. The Loaf of Bread Test was unwittingly invented by the husband of a friend. He made sandwiches for my friend and himself. There wasn’t much bread left so he made his sandwich with the crusts and gave her the good slices. It was such a tiny gesture — mundane even. It’s not Insta-worthy, you wouldn’t put it on Facebook and

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Day 5 on the road: to North Carolina

Following a productive visit to Dayton, Miss D. and I hit the road on Thursday morning, and turned south towards North Carolina.  After a period of heavy traffic making our way through the Cincinnati metroplex and across the Kentucky border, we settled down to a steady pace on what was probably the most enjoyable day on the road of this trip so far.  The roads through Kentucky were generally pretty good, the traffic was bearable, and the weather was enjoyable. All went smoothly until we passed through Knoxville, TN.  Google Maps warned us of a couple of slowdowns ahead, one quite small

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The medical profession and a broken heart

In his highly entertaining (if chemically and scientifically esoteric) book “Excuse Me Sir, Would You Like to Buy a Kilo of Isopropyl Bromide?“, chemical engineer and industrial chemist Max Gergel starts out by describing his university studies, and his (frequently unsuccessful) romantic endeavors, during World War II.  In one incident, he describes the breakup of a relationship he’d taken far more seriously than the lady concerned.  So upset was he, both physically and mentally, that he sought a doctor’s advice. Dr. Silver was an unusual man. He did not prescribe medicine; he gave shots. These were ordered from outside the city. They

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