For the umpteenth time: it’s not the object that’s the problem, it’s the person using it!

How many times have we tried to explain that a tool – like a gun, or a knife, or a hammer, or a motor vehicle, or whatever – is not to blame for its misuse?  It has no moral volition of its own, no ability to choose.  Those reside in the person using – or misusing – it.  Blame them for the problem, not the thing they’re using! This has just been demonstrated yet again to the police in London, England. Robbery gangs have turned to using pushbikes in the face of a police crackdown on moped crime, it has been revealed. Both the

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The grasshoppers are already coming after the ants

A few days ago, I noted: Another big problem is the unintended consequences of government policies to address the pandemic.  For example, many local and state governments are releasing lower-level inmates from prisons, to alleviate overcrowding and forestall the spread of COVID-19 in such close quarters.  That’s a legitimate health objective . . . but it disregards public safety issues.  Those inmates are going to have to start earning a living on the street again, just when almost all businesses have been shut down under quarantine.  What are they going to do?  You know as well as I what they’re going to do

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Looks like the rumor mill was correct about street drugs .

Back on March 13th I wrote: I’m hearing interesting things from [my law enforcement friends] about the supply of illegal drugs in our major metropolitan areas.  Basically, that supply is being cut off at the knees by the slowdown in world trade.  I hadn’t realized how much the drug trade was dependent upon Chinese chemicals and precursor materials to process coca leaves into cocaine, or to make methamphetamine or heroin.  Also, apparently most of the synthetic marijuana (a.k.a. “spice”) on the market comes from China, or is made with ingredients supplied from there. This is apparently resulting in a severe shortage of illegal

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Online sources for those seeking a firearm

With the current shortage of firearms for sale, caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the panic buying it’s sparked, I know some people really need a firearm, but can’t find one at a price they can afford. There are two major online sources I’ve used in the past, that aren’t seeking to profiteer from the current panic, and ask fair and reasonable prices for their goods (at least, they do at the time of writing).  They are, in alphabetical order: Buds Gun Shop   CDNN Sports There are many more online vendors, of course, but I happen to know these

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The pandemic leads to an explosion in firearms and ammunition sales

I’m frankly astonished at the sudden, huge increase in demand for firearms and ammunition as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.  Gun shops are reporting land-office business, and ammunition vendors – even the largest online-only operations – are so swamped by sudden, massive orders that they’re running out of stock.  Some sample headlines: Fears Over Coronavirus Pandemic Driving Up Gun Sales It’s not just toilet paper: People line up to buy guns, ammo over coronavirus concerns Coronavirus triggers massive spike in firearms and ammunition sales Crime Craze: People are Buying Guns in Preparation for Coronavirus Violence It’s not just in

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A major enhancement to an already good pistol

Last year I wrote about the new Glock 43X pistol, and mentioned that it had supplanted my long-time favorite pocket carry pistol in 9mm Parabellum, the Springfield XDS. There were a lot of rumors last year about an aftermarket higher-capacity magazine for the 43X.  They proved to be correct.  After much testing, Shield Arms released its S15 model, increasing the magazine capacity of the Glock 43X and 48 to no less than 15 rounds – a full 50% improvement over the factory offering.  Click the image below for a larger view. Shield Arms did away with the polymer outer layer in which

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Rape, political correctness, and the real world

Yet again we’ve seen the usual suspects scream in outrage at even the suggestion that women’s behavior might just possibly contribute to their getting raped.  This time it’s in Kenya. A top Kenyan university has apologised after blaming “reckless” female students for becoming victims of rape. The security memo, which was sent to all students on Tuesday, was “insensitive”, the University of Nairobi’s vice-chancellor admitted. A petition started in response to the memo questioned how women could be blamed for their own rape. Popular media personality, Adelle Onyango, posted on Instagram: “This is what victim shaming looks like.” . . .

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COVID-19: an update, and planning considerations

Last week I wrote about preparing for the economic impact of China’s coronavirus epidemic.  It now looks certain that it’s going to cause major disruptions to world trade, and probably to the social fabric of many (perhaps most) countries – including the United States.  COVID-19 is showing a very rapid infection rate, far faster than might be expected.  South Korea went from zero reported cases to (at the time of writing) 1,146 infected and 11 dead in less than a week.  Italy has gone from zero to 229 infected and 7 dead in a similar period.  The USA now has 53 confirmed cases,

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Reactions to coronavirus in China are echoing the Ebola epidemic in Africa

I’m seeing a number of similarities between the way that China is responding to the coronavirus epidemic, and the way governments and individuals responded to Ebola in Africa.  Frankly, I’m startled, because the Chinese government should know better, and its people are more educated than the average African:  yet, the similarities persist. Consider government actions to control an outbreak of disease.  In Africa, we saw: Initial denial.  Governments tried to protect their economies, particularly tourism, by denying that there was an epidemic at all.  Those insisting that the problem was real were denigrated, mocked, and sometimes even locked up by

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“Plankton powered rubber duck bombs”???

The new Armed Forces minister in Britain is raising eyebrows (and not before time, IMHO!) with his views on the future of warfare. Special Forces of the future should be planting malware in enemy servers rather than fighting wars with daggers, the new armed forces minister said yesterday. James Heappey, a former Army officer, said … the military needed ‘to think the incredible’ to win wars now and referred to the Alexa smart speaker as a model for innovation, adding: ‘Alexa, fight my war.’ . . . Speaking at the Royal United Services Institute (Rusi) think tank, he said: ‘We have

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