Sunday morning music

Here’s a work by a Finnish composer of whom I’d never heard until just the other day.  It’s the Third Symphony in F Major, Op. 40, composed by Erkki Melartin in 1907.  I find it reminiscent of Gustav Mahler’s work.  The four movements are: 1 – Allegro moderato 00:00 2 – Andante 09:08 3 – Scherzo (Vivacissimo) 18:19 4 – Largo 28:34   Interesting music, and a nice change of pace from last week’s rock memorial. Peter

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Sunday morning music

This morning’s post is by way of a eulogy for Neil Peart, late drummer and lyricist for Canadian rock band Rush.  He died of brain cancer a few days ago. It’s almost impossible to praise too highly Peart’s contribution to rock music, and the role of percussion instruments in that genre.  He won no less than 38 awards from Modern Drummer magazine.  He won the “Best Rock Drummer” award every year from 1980-1986, and had to be taken off the nominee list and given his own emeritus mention, just so that others could have a chance at the title!  In his obituary, the magazine

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Sunday morning music

Here’s something rather different from our usual Sunday morning fare.  Two years ago today, in 2018, I put up a dialog from a Dungeons & Dragons game by Daddy Warpig.  It made me laugh, and amused a lot of my readers as well. I came across that post the other day, and laughed all over again.  It started me wondering . . . how much music is out there that was inspired by D&D?  A quick search on YouTube revealed dozens of songs, but most of them were very amateurish and not particularly funny.  One, however, caught my eye – this

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Bob Gibson said…

Paolo Benedetto Bellinzani was an 18th-century Italian composer.  Not much of his output is remembered today, but his Sonata for Flute in D Minor is one of them.  It’s a light, pleasant piece that makes easy listening. I hope your post-Christmas digestion is recovering from the overload – just in time for the New Year celebrations next week! Peter

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Sunday morning music

Enough with the Christmas muzak already!  Let’s have something that’s both tuneful and prayerful.  Words aren’t necessary. First, here’s Mannheim Steamroller with “Fum, Fum, Fum“.  It’s a very old tune from Catalonia in Spain.  (Lyrics at the link above.) Next, an ancient English air, “Greensleeves”, the tune of which was adapted in the 19th century to the Christmas carol “What Child Is This?“.  Lindsey Stirling does the honors. Here’s a hymn from the Orthodox Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom, which was set to music by Tchaikovsky in 1878.  It’s not Christmas music, strictly speaking, but it seems to me to fit in very well with the season. 

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Sunday morning music

It seems only yesterday that we celebrated Christmas . . . but another year has passed, and the liturgical calendar has rolled around yet again. I don’t know about you, but I’m heartily sick of the ghastly versions of Christmas carols one hears in every supermarket and shopping mall (and over far too many radio stations) at this time of year.  As an antidote, here’s the Choir of Kings College, Cambridge, with their “Carols from Kings” album.  The track listing (time in minutes and seconds, followed by title) is as follows: 00:00:00 Once in royal David’s city 00:04:41 Rejoice and be

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Sunday morning music

AC/DC‘s classic rock hit “Thunderstruck” has become an international icon of the classic rock scene.  Here’s the original music video. However, there have been almost innumerable covers and different versions of the song – some a serious attempt at music, others rather less so.  I thought I’d gather up some of the oddballs, and see if you like them. Here’s 2Cellos with their not-quite-classical rendition. The BadPiper had a go at it in hard-blowing fashion. A 12-year-old self-taught Chinese guitarist produced this outstanding rendition for acoustic guitar. Finnish parody group Steve’N’Seagulls tried it in bluegrass style. Here’s Luna Lee tackling “Thunderstruck” on the gayageum, a traditional Korean instrument.

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Sunday morning music

Let’s have something melodic and peaceful to round out the Thanksgiving weekend.  Here’s Giuseppe Antonio Brescianello‘s concerto for violin, oboe, strings & b.c. in G minor.  La Cetra Barockorchester Basel is conducted by Vaclav Luks. Peter

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Sunday morning music

Guitar and rock aficionados will instantly recognize the name of Yngwie Malmsteen.  He’s been active for over 40 years, and, a decade ago, was rated 7th out of 10 of the greatest electric guitar players of all time.  He has an almost cult-like fan following. Although he’s generally considered to fall into the heavy metal genre, his playing style has been described as neoclassical.  He’s always been open about the influence of classical music and musicians on his playing style.  I thought rock and classical music buffs alike might like to hear him talk about that, and offer examples.  I close

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Sunday morning music

Sunday morning music Now and again, a musical performance comes along that makes me laugh out loud.  This morning’s offering did just that.  What happens when a baroque percussion ensemble meets AC/DC?  Listen for yourself, and find out! I think that must have been an absolute hoot for the musicians.  Full marks! Peter

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