Truth is hard in a special-snowflake world

Film screenwriter, director and producer Christopher McQuarrie sent a string of tweets a few days ago that encapsulate how he sees the industry, and how to achieve success in it.  He’s blunt (almost brutally so) about how nobody’s going to do the work if you don’t, and how you can’t expect the Success Fairy to alight on your shoulders and sprinkle you with magic dust, or something like that.  Here’s an excerpt. 1.  I‘m receiving a lot of questions from writers asking where to submit scripts or how to sell them. Others ask how to sign an agent, attach directors or producers, etc. You

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Heh

Found on Gab: Yes, I’ve had a few moments like that.  I forget who first said that humans share a common language called profanity, but it’s all too true! Peter

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Marriage and the “loaf of bread test”

I was pleased to read an Australian article offering a fresh perspective on what makes a good, sound relationship.  It may seem trite, but it echoes what I used to say to couples in marriage counseling (as a pastor) for many years. The Loaf of Bread Test was unwittingly invented by the husband of a friend. He made sandwiches for my friend and himself. There wasn’t much bread left so he made his sandwich with the crusts and gave her the good slices. It was such a tiny gesture — mundane even. It’s not Insta-worthy, you wouldn’t put it on Facebook and

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“Forget Bribery. The Real Scam Is Pretending That Degrees Have Value.”

That’s the title of an article in Bloomberg by Elaine Ou.  She makes some good points. … none of the parents involved in the recent college admissions bribery scandal tried to get their kids into Caltech or MIT, the sort of universities where students are generally expected to acquire skills relevant to a productive career. As it turns out, parents pay obscene sums to marshal their offspring into elite schools not for the sake of education, but to secure their offspring’s socioeconomic status. Successful parents in the upper middle class can leave money to their children, but that doesn’t guarantee entrée into the social elite. The more

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Quote of the day

Received via e-mail, original source unknown: That would certainly solve most of our problems, political, social, economic and cultural.  Sadly, few people are willing to do so.  They always want someone else to do it – and pay for it as well. Peter

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Not a bad attitude towards money, IMHO

From Pearls Before Swine yesterday (click the image to be taken to a larger view at the comic’s Web site): I approve.  I’ve met a number of fairly wealthy people in my time, some during my business career, others as a pastor or chaplain.  The one trait most of them had in common was that they didn’t own their money . . . their money owned them.  They spent so much time worrying about how to keep it, and how to make more, that they forgot to sit back, relax, and enjoy what they had. I don’t ever want to be like that.

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The (political) Pilgrim’s Progress

“The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World, to That Which Is to Come” is one of the most significant works of religious allegory in the English language.  Penned by John Bunyan in 1678, it’s been in print ever since. On Gab the other day, I saw this cartoon illustration of a political pilgrim’s progress.  It made me smile. Click the image for a larger view. I don’t know about “this party” or “the party which is to come”, but even so, it’s a fun analogy. Peter

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