The entitlement mentality at work – even among refugees

It seems that thousands of refugees, denied access to the fleshpots of Europe’s most generous welfare states, are prepared to commit violence to get to them.  Austria’s largest newspaper, Kronen Zeitung, reports (original in German, translation courtesy of Google Translate): The most up-to-date information of the liaison officers on the situation in the Bosnian-Croatian border area at Velika-Kladusa, 224 kilometers from Spielfeld, is located on the desk of the head of department at the Ministry of the Interior. Their analysis: A breakthrough attempt by “at least 20,000 migrants” at this border crossing to Central Europe could be imminent.“The Croats are really trying to

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The march of the “refugee” army ants

We’re accustomed to hearing illegal aliens, attempting to enter First World nations, described as “refugees” or “victims”, or words to that effect.  Their “plight” is blamed on wars, violence, crime, and other such disruptions.  It’s a constant drumbeat of propaganda in much of the mainstream media.  For example, the Wall Street Journal claimed last week that criminal gang violence is a major reason behind efforts by South Americans to come to the USA. [In El Salvador,] Politicians must ask permission of gangs to hold rallies or canvass in many neighborhoods, law-enforcement officials and prosecutors said. In San Salvador, the nation’s capital, gangs control

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Sunday morning music

Here’s a blast from my family’s musical past. Conductor, arranger and orchestra leader Annunzio Mantovani was born in Italy in 1905, but spent most of his life in Britain.  During World War II his light orchestra was a favorite in that country, and both of my parents (who were born and raised there) enjoyed his music.  (His Italian origin doesn’t seem to have affected his popularity, even though his adopted country was then at war with the land of his birth.)  He didn’t rest on his laurels, but released many post-war albums, in the USA as well as England (in 1959 he

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Drones again – and a nasty terrorism threat

It seems small unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, are again in the news – and not in a good way. U.S. Border Patrol agents based in San Diego have spotted 15 drones flying between Tijuana, Mexico, and Southern California over the past 12 months, according to new data provided to the Washington Examiner.Not one of the drone operators involved in those incidents was prosecuted for using an unmanned aerial system, or drone, around the international border, which is protected air space.From Oct. 1, 2016, through Sept. 30, 2017, the same border sector reported two known incidents. In fiscal 2016, five occurred. Before

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First you’re the target market, then you’re the problem

I’m cynically amused by an apparent pull-back in the granting of easy credit to consumers. Capital One Financial Corp. and Discover Financial Services said last week they have become more cautious in how they’re handling credit limits. The two lenders said they don’t currently see signs of deterioration in consumers’ ability to pay their debts but do question how much longer the economic recovery will last.“In so many ways, one can’t help but be struck by…just how good the economy [at] this point is,” Capital One Chief Executive Richard Fairbank said on the company’s earnings call. “And in some ways, it almost

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A long day homeward bound

On Tuesday, Miss D. and I headed for Cimarron, NM, about three hours from Cañon City, CO.  It was an interesting drive, to put it mildly!  We started off with low gray skies, mist on the road, and a fair amount of drizzle, sometimes turning into light rain.  By the time we reached Raton Pass, the weather had turned thoroughly nasty.  This picture, taken by Miss D. during one of the clearer intervals, doesn’t show the full vision-dimming effects of wind-driven snow and sleet, but they made driving difficult.  I was glad we have stability control on our new-to-us vehicle.  The road conditions

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A final reminder about the Dragon Awards

As I mentioned some days ago, a reader contacted me to ask about nominating one of my books for this year’s Dragon Awards.  That was a pleasant surprise, and I invited him to go ahead, on the understanding that there are many good books out there, and I don’t think I’m likely to be in the running this year. Be that as it may, the deadline for nominations is July 20th.  Therefore, if you think the book is good enough, please use the DragonCon nomination form to nominate “An Airless Storm” for this year’s awards, in the category “Best Military

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Sounds like a war to me

The likely winner of Mexico’s imminent presidential elections appears to have declared war on US sovereignty. Mexican presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) called for mass immigration to the United States during a speech Tuesday declaring it a “human right” for all North Americans. “And soon, very soon — after the victory of our movement — we will defend all the migrants in the American continent and all the migrants in the world,” Obrador said, adding that immigrants “must leave their towns and find a life in the United States.” He then declared it as “a human right we

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Waste not – because there’s nowhere to put it

It looks as if China’s decision to stop accepting a large proportion of the world’s plastic and paper waste products is going to have a dramatic impact on the way we live. In the wake of China’s decision to stop importing nearly half of the world’s scrap starting Jan. 1, particularly from the wealthiest nations, waste management operations across the country are struggling to process heavy volumes of paper and plastic that they can no longer unload on the Chinese. States such as Massachusetts and Oregon are lifting restrictions against pouring recyclable material into landfills to grant the operations some

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