Belt knives at bargain prices

Now and again I come across products that are so useful, and offer such good value for money, that I have to recommend them to my readers.  I don’t get paid or compensated for doing so – that would make it a commercial transaction, rather than a personal recommendation, and I don’t do that here. Fixed-blade knives are usually stronger than folding blades, although that’s not always the case.  There are general-purpose blades, and more specialized ones such as skinning knives used by hunters, fishing filet and bait knives, and so on.  A good general-purpose field knife is a very, very useful tool. 

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A reader weighs in on the Tac Tool debate

Yesterday’s post about the Ka-Bar Tac Tool produced a number of comments and e-mails among those who know about and use such things.  One extended reply was submitted by reader Raven, who agreed to share it with all of us.  Given his background and experience, I found it interesting. My comments are not too well organized but do come from 50 years of manual labor- mechanical, logging, commercial fishing, woodworking etc. Modern life is packed with gadgets- any hobby or vocation is filled with trinkets to part people from their money- newest and best gimmick on the block syndrome- everyone looking

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No word on the smell . . .

I was taken aback (sort of) by reading about a new technique for producing bricks . . . using human urine. The world’s first ‘bio-brick’ made from human urine was unveiled by University of Cape Town (UCT) civil engineering masters student Suzanne Lambert on Wednesday. . . . Dr Dyllon Randall, Lambert’s supervisor and senior lecturer in water quality at UCT, explained that the “bio brick” is created through a natural process called microbial carbonate precipitation. “It’s not unlike the way seashells are formed,” Randall said. Parts of the urine are combined with loose sand and a bacteria to produce an enzyme

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Bombing a forest fire?

I hadn’t heard of aircraft bombing a forest fire to stop it spreading and help put it out, but the tactic was used in Sweden this week, apparently with some success. … on Jul. 25, a Gripen dropped a 500-lb GBU-12 Laser Guided Bomb from 3.000 meters in an attempt to cut fire affecting Älvdalen’s shooting range, a military range where unexploded ammunition and difficult terrain made conventional extinguishing methods not sufficient. The Swedish pilot dropped the GBU-12 so that the bomb would cut the fire at a certain distance from the impact point: a fire requires oxygen, heat and fuel. The explosion

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Zeroing a rifle for Maximum Point-Blank Range (MPBR)

Blue Collar Prepping has an interesting article about how to do this.  It goes into more detail, and greater complexity, than the usual approach to determining MPBR, but it does so in a useful way and is well explained.  Recommended reading for rifle shooters, whether novice or experienced. If you haven’t run into the concept before, here are a few articles explaining it: What is “Maximum Point Blank Range” Hunting? Maximum point-blank range Understanding MPBR For Better Shooting Learn Your Maximum Point-Blank Range Peter

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Another interesting military application for drones

Last year, I wrote about the early days of mine detecting vehicles in Rhodesia and South Africa, of which I had a certain amount of personal experience.  They progressed from looking for metallic land mines, to using ground-penetrating radar to look for the holes dug to take them (which allowed them to look for plastic or wood mines as well). Now the same approach appears to offer promise when adapted to small, low-cost drone aircraft. Most civilized nations ban the use of landmines because they kill indiscriminately, and for years after they are planted. However, they are still used in many places

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