So… how do they navigate?

I found this pair of photographs on Gab yesterday, showing a lighthouse on Lake Michigan near St. Joseph during and after a winter storm.  Clickit to biggit. I’ve seen similar photographs before, of course, as I’m sure have most of my readers.  However, I’d never thought about one obvious question.  If the lighthouse is required by ships on the lake for safe navigation, what happens when it’s shrouded in ice and its light can no longer be seen?  Is waterborne traffic suspended until it defrosts?  Is, there, in fact, any waterborne traffic on the Great Lakes during the winter months, or does everything come

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Bureaucrats and temperatures

There’s been a certain amount of hilarity hereabouts – not to mention anger – at the latest bureaucratic advice on how to deal with hot weather. The coolest temperature Americans should keep their thermostats set to is 78 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Energy Star, a federal program aimed at energy efficiency and cost savings for consumers. But many on social media do not agree with that recommendation. And social media users were even more vocal in objecting to Energy Star’s recommendation for nighttime thermostat settings. . . . Energy Star, a joint federal program run by the Department of Energy (DOE)

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Day 3 on the road: onward to Ohio

Yesterday (Tuesday) Miss D. and I rose at a leisurely hour and hit the road for the short hop from Indianapolis to Dayton, Ohio.  It’s only a couple of hours’ drive, by far the shortest leg of our journey, so we weren’t stressed for time and could relax and enjoy the sights. We were glad to see that agriculture in this part of the world is in a somewhat healthier condition than any other state we’ve been through so far this trip.  We began to see fields where planting had been accomplished, although the crops weren’t as tall as they should be

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We need a season to dry out from summer!

It’s been far wetter and stormier than usual in northern Texas during spring, and that looks set to continue into early summer.  Miss D. and I have only lived here for three and a half years, but people who’ve been here all their lives are also complaining.  The ground is sodden – it has almost no capacity to absorb new moisture, so any fresh rain that falls simply runs off into creeks and rivers.  This is the result (clickit to biggit): That’s the Red River, on the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma, where it’s crossed by Interstate 44.  It’s been about ten

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Sometimes the jokes just write themselves

I did a double-take on reading this report. The owner of the life-size replica of Noah’s Ark in Northern Kentucky has sued its insurers for refusing to cover, of all things … rain damage. Ark Encounter, which unveiled the 510-foot-long model in 2016, says that heavy rains in 2017 and 2018 caused a landslide on its access road, and its five insurance carriers refused to cover nearly $1 million in damages. There’s more at the link. But . . . what if the insurers claim that rain damage to (of all things!) Noah’s Ark was, almost by definition, an Act of God? Peter

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That’s a hell of a wakeup call

It’s coming up 2 a.m. in a few moments, and Mother Nature has clearly decided I don’t need to get any more sleep for a while.  Our house is right underneath the brightest, wettest and noisiest part of the big yellow band right now, just about in the center of this image. One cat is hiding under the bed in the guest room, and flatly refusing to move.  The other is alternately making love to my ankles in the hope that I’ll provide milk or cream at this ungodly hour, or trying to climb into my lap every time there’s

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