“Identity politics”: an existential threat to our society

I’ve been watching the growing rift in American society for years.  It’s particularly evident in larger cities, but it’s also happening in smaller towns and rural areas.  It’s a growing intolerance with those who hold different views, a refusal to admit that the “other side” might be right at least sometimes, a dogmatic insistence that it’s “our way or the highway” when it comes to politics, law enforcement, immigration, economics, whatever.  There’s less and less willingness to compromise.  Many commentators have begun to speak openly of the possibility of a new civil war.  For example, consider these articles: What Might

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Identity politics, tribes, and nations

Last week I called identity politics “an existential threat to our society“.  The article attracted quite a lot of interest, with some discussion on other blogs, and a number of comments, some of which were rather negative.  I think perhaps I didn’t elaborate enough on one aspect of the problem – hence this morning’s post. We give our loyalty to groups in an expanding hierarchy, or circle of influence, as it were.  The innermost circle are our families and closest confidants.  The second circle is those for and with whom we’re willing to stand under almost any circumstances.  I’d call

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Chain migration’s effect on one Pennsylvania town

City Journal recently published an in-depth article about the effect of chain migration on Hazelton, Pennsylvania.  It’s a startling and eye-opening piece of journalism.  Here’s a lengthy excerpt.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis. With a population long dominated by the descendants of European immigrants, Hazleton has been radically transformed since the early 2000s by secondary chain migration, principally driven by Dominicans—immigrants, both legal and illegal, as well as second- and third-generation citizens arriving from the New York metropolitan area. In 2000, Hispanics made up less than 5 percent of Hazleton’s population; they now account for more than 50 percent.

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