This baffles me

According to a report in the London Telegraph, UK police have lost over £700,000 (more than $1.4 million) in equipment over recent months. The losses include “27 motor vehicles, 50 computers, 104 radio handsets, 149 satellite navigation systems and 189 mobile phones. Other missing items include 109 batons, 187 pairs of handcuffs, 113 torches and 141 police caps and helmets.” You know, the US invaded Iraq with not much more electronic equipment than that! There are other, more interesting items missing: for example, “two metal replicas of police officers worth £200 each, lost by Durham Constabulary, a £95, 9ft cardboard

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Military Motivators

EDITED TO ADD: The Military Motivators blog has been discontinued and taken down, due to circumstances in the life of its author. Blackfive has taken over the Military Motivators archives, and is now publishing new ones as well. To view them, click on the link above. Peter __________ A few weeks ago I mentioned Demotivators and linked to their Web site. Today I’d like to introduce you to Military Motivators. I highly recommend spending an hour or two going through their archives. If you’ve served in the military you’ll split your sides at a bunch of them: and even if

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Doofus Of The Day #7

Calling all learner drivers . . . If you want to get drunk . . . And then cut donuts in a parking lot with your car . . . It’s not a good idea to pick the police station parking lot to do so! *Sheesh!* (For those who don’t get the ‘hoon’ reference in the linked report, it’s Australian slang. See here for an explanation.) Peter

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Weekend Wings #5: Russian Aircraft-Carriers And Their Planes

In Weekend Wings #3 we looked at the historical relationship between the Sopwith Pup, the first fighter to operate from an aircraft carrier (in 1917) and the forthcoming Lockheed F-35 Lightning II, which will be the latest to do so. There were two sets of questions from readers about that post. The first, concerning biplanes, was answered last week. The second, from three readers, was to ask what the Soviet Union had done to match the USA and the West in the operation of aircraft carriers and the development of vertical-take-off aircraft like the Harrier and the F-35B model of

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So you’re going to have a colonoscopy?

I received the following by e-mail from a friend (hat-tip to Gordon). A physician claimed that the following are actual comments made by his patients (predominantly male) while he was performing their colonoscopies. “Take it easy, Doc. You’re boldly going where no man has gone before!” “Find Amelia Earhart yet?” “Can you hear me NOW?” “Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?” “You know, in Arkansas this makes us legally married.” “Any sign of the trapped miners, Chief?” “You put your left hand in, you take your left hand out . . . “ “Hey!

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So you want to eat out tonight?

How about a rather splendiferous feast . . . at a cost of only $2,000 per person? The experience is available at the Vivat Bacchus restaurant in London, England. They’ll serve it to a maximum of six guests, and it must be booked 48 hours in advance. The meal begins with a glass of champagne (what else?). Then comes: Royal Sevruga caviar accompanied by Kaufmann vodka; Fresh Bahama rock lobster linguini with a glass of Forrester Chenin white wine; Joselita two-year-old matured ham from Spain with a glass of Vega Sicilia Unico red wine; Grilled Wagyu fillet steak from Australia

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Lest we forget . . . Stalingrad

Sixty-five years ago today, the battered remnants of the Wehrmacht’s Sixth Army surrendered to Soviet forces in the ruins of Stalingrad. The Soviet victory came halfway through the reversal of fortune that ended the German string of successes in World War II and led to a series of Allied advances that culminated in victory in Europe in May 1945. The reversal encompassed the Second Battle of El Alamein in the Western Desert in October-November 1942; the Allied invasion of North-West Africa in November 1942; Stalingrad; victory in Africa in May 1943; and the turning of the tide in the Battle

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One month down the road.

This blog ‘went live’ at 8.11 p.m. on Tuesday, January 1st, 2008. Yesterday marked my first month of blogging. I hope you’ve had as much fun reading it as I have writing it. About 500 of you come here every day – 15,634 total visits during January – so I suspect at least some of you do! If you like what you read here, please tell your friends. If you don’t like it, tell me – in comments or via e-mail – and I’ll try to do better. Thanks for joining me. It’s good to have online buddies. Peter

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Great piloting skills

Have you ever been in a plane that’s had to land in a storm or very strong crosswind? I have, on a couple of occasions – the sort of landings that cure your constipation once and for all. Here’s video shot a few days ago at Leeds-Bradford Airport in England. The aircraft is an Embraer ERJ 145, similar to many flying in the US today, and it’s trying to get down in a 50 mph crosswind. Apparently many aircraft diverted from that airport to others that day because their pilots found it too difficult. This pilot, however, nailed it –

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Tyranny In Red Tights

Strange title, no? It’s not original, but taken from this outstanding post over at The Line Is Here. The post explores incremental, creeping government tyranny and how it affects us all. If you, like me, believe that a meaningful society is founded upon the rights of the individual rather than the powers of the state, click on the link and spend a few minutes reading it. Excellent work! Peter

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