Can Airsoft and BB gun training translate to real firearms? You bet they can!

A few years ago, I recommended the use of BB and/or Airsoft handguns as an ultra-low-cost training resource, to improve skill with a real handgun.  I repeated that advice a couple of days ago in a new article.  After that came out, I was challenged by a few shooters who insisted that “playing with a toy” could not possibly translate to usable shooting skills with a real firearm, and that I was “sucking this out of my thumb”. I’m never going to persuade everyone:  but to those willing to watch with an open mind, here’s about as much proof as you’ll ever

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“Unsalvageable” humans?

An article in Taki’s Magazine refers to some human beings as “The Unsalvageables“.  Here’s an excerpt. Some of you might remember Anthony Stokes. He was a 15-year-old DeKalb County, Ga., hood rat with a bum ticker who kept getting passed over for a heart transplant because of his “high risk” lifestyle, which included burglary, weapons charges, arson, and neglecting to take his prescribed meds. Seeing how donor hearts aren’t found on trees (or in Dollar Trees), doctors were reluctant to give a young crime lord in training one of the precious organs. So Anthony’s granmoms or auntie or whoever the hell

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The radioactive tanks of Chernobyl

There’s a fascinating article at Firearms News titled “The Radioactive ISU-152“.  It describes how some of the biggest, heaviest tanks of World War II returned to the scene of one of their victories, four decades later, to act as saviors rather than destroyers. The SU/ISU-152 was designed specifically to be a part of both the shock and breakthrough elements of the Soviet Deep Battle doctrine. The KV heavy tank chassis would provide the base for the massive ML-20S, a portable version of the standard 152mm howitzer in service. The gun had a range of 10km for indirect fire but was reduced to less

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Kidney stones: a follow-up report

In May last year, I wrote about two over-the-counter, non-prescription “remedies” for kidney stones that I’d been trying out.  I reported considerable success with them at the time, and I’ve continued to use them since then.  I’ve also experimented with different dosages. I’m pleased to report that for the past eight months, I’ve been kidney-stone-free.  That’s a huge improvement for me compared to earlier, when I was passing a kidney stone every two to three months, and experiencing considerable pain associated with them.  In particular, I’ve narrowed down my dosage to two capsules every morning (half the recommended dose of two capsules morning

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Demonizing gun-owners: what to expect, and what to do

The gun control legislation being put forward by the new Democratic-dominated government of Virginia echoes and extends measures already implemented in other anti-gun and anti-Second-Amendment entities such as California, the city of Washington D.C., and many other jurisdictions.  Their common feature is that they seek to demonize gun owners, in so many words, as threats to public safety and security simply because they dare to own – much less use – firearms.  This even includes disparaging their mental health. Those of us living in firearm-friendly jurisdictions have probably not given much thought to how our lives may change if such measures come to our

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Snow, ice, and off-road excursions

Last weekend Miss D. and I drove to a seminar held at a lakeside resort east of Gainesville, TX.  Unfortunately, that coincided with the arrival of a rare snowstorm.  Our normally safe roads were suddenly covered with 2-3 inches of snow, with patches of ice forming beneath the snow, invisible until you hit it. This was US Highway 82 near Gainesville at about 8 AM on Saturday morning.  The photograph looks clearer than conditions actually were, and doesn’t capture the snow falling fairly thickly.  The car was distinctly “twitchy” over the slush in the tire ruts. A drive that normally takes 2 hours took

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Heh

Found at Wirecutter’s place: I’d say many of the former military servicemen I’ve met – particularly former Navy personnel – are poster children for the first group.  I can still remember the retired Chief Petty Officer who informed me (very loudly) that coffee wasn’t coffee unless you could stand your teaspoon upright in it, without support.  Also, it had to be as strong and as bitter as possible, “like me!”  As for milk, sugar and that other stuff . . . the less said, the better! It does help one understand why so few millennials, comparatively speaking, will consider military service. 

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The Panama Canal, faster than usual

Courtesy of Old Salt Blog, here’s a time-lapse video of a passage through the Panama Canal.  The trip lasts 11 hours, but the video takes less than 7 minutes – much more palatable in our high-speed world!  Note the “locomotives” on either side of the ship, hauling it through the locks.  They’re partly visible from time to time, as in the video ‘cover image’ below, on the right of the ship’s bow. The digging of the Panama Canal remains one of the great adventure stories of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  It advanced not only navigation, but also medicine,

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