Doofus Of The Day #1,008

I’m obliged to reader Snoggeramus for sending me a copy of this image (origin unknown): Sometimes the jokes just write themselves, don’t they?  Let’s see, now: What can we take away from this? The misspelling subtracts something from the message. Errors are multiplied, it seems. Opinions about the effectiveness of the advertisement are divided. Math is clearly more tricky than meth. Please feel free to add your own in Comments! Peter

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When false advertising becomes “Fake News”

Last week, it was revealed that an alleged “authority” on student loans, and what students do with them, was not only fake:  “he” was also steering students who approached “him” for advice towards a student loan refinancing service operated by “his” creators.  As far as I’m concerned, that’s not only false advertising, but fraud by any other name. Drew Cloud is everywhere. The self-described journalist who specializes in student-loan debt has been quoted in major news outlets, including The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and CNBC, and is a fixture in the smaller, specialized blogosphere of student debt. . .

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Don’t just live your faith – eat it!

I’m giggling at some of the reactions to a British bakery’s Christmas advertisement. A British bakery chain has apologized after creating a Nativity scene in which Baby Jesus, surrounded by three wise men, was replaced with a sausage roll. And not just any sausage roll, but one that had been bitten into. Greggs, the largest bakery chain in Britain, released the image of the sausage roll nestled in a straw-filled manger to help promote its $32 advent calendar. But no sooner had the image of the sausage roll savior been published than consumers of all faiths took to Twitter to

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Interesting . . . did Trump beat Hillary through better data analysis?

Dave Karpf says that “digital inexperience paid off” for the Trump campaign, in a big way. The 2016 Trump campaign’s digital director, Brad Parscale, was featured on 60 Minutes last week. Much of the interview focused on the central role of Facebook in Trump’s digital strategy. Parscale shared that he “understood early that Facebook was how Donald Trump was going to win. Twitter is how he talked to the people. Facebook was going to be how he won. …We did [ads] on Twitter, Google search, other platforms. Facebook was the 500-pound gorilla, 80 percent of the budget kind of thing.”

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More April Fool fun

Here are a few more April Fool japes that caught my eye.  First, how about your very own do-it-yourself home cremation kit?  (I can so see Lawdog and Old NFO fixing me up with one of these . . . ) Next, what if Amazon’s Alexa artificial intelligence digital assistant talked to pets as well as people? Then, courtesy of a reader comment in my first April Fool post this morning, there’s the false volcanic eruption up in Alaska one year. And finally, how about a bet on a race of a rather different kind? Peter

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Happy April Fool’s Day!

Yes, it’s that time of year again.  To celebrate, here are some of the better April Fool jokes/advertisements/whatever that I’ve found so far. First, what happens when you use gin in your sauna, instead of water? Next, Burger King in France has a mouth-not-so-watering idea. It’s a worthy successor to their gourmet one-fry-at-a-time advertisement last year. And finally, the good people at Vintage Wings of Canada have compiled a wonderful series of ‘spoof’ World War II propaganda posters, composed especially for April Fool’s Day this year.  Here’s just one example. There are many more at the link. Very funny, and

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Why not just call them liars?

I’m more than a little annoyed at the circumspection with which Facebook is being treated after acknowledging its fourth ‘mistake’ concerning viewer metrics in as many months. On Friday, Facebook revealed faulty metrics with Instant Articles, its mobile publishing system, the fourth disclosure of a measurement error since September. The admission sharpened calls for more independent organizations to monitor the performance of digital advertising. And some large firms that buy a lot of ads said they will more closely scrutinize their spending on the social networking giant and could shift marketing dollars elsewhere. . . . In September, Facebook shared

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But(t) why???

I’m a little taken aback by some of the latest consumer products – this one, for example. A few questions: Why?  I mean, what’s the point of scented toilet paper?  If it’s just hanging in your bathroom, it won’t do much.  It has to be moved to give off its scent – such as when you’re actually using it – but at that time, any pleasant smell it may have is rapidly going to be overlaid by a rather stronger odor, one that’s anything but as pleasant! Why mulled spice?  Anything coming out of your nether regions is definitely going

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