A dependent society is a dystopian, Orwellian society

That appears to be the core of Aaron Clarey’s argument in an article on his blog.  It’s depressing, to say the least, yet the evidence of it is all around us.  It’s more predominant in many European nations, and in larger US cities, than it is in more rural, self-reliant areas;  yet its impact is undeniable.  I’ve personally witnessed it as a pastor in many inner-city areas of our nation. Here’s what I think is the core of Mr. Clarey’s case.  As I said, it’s depressing:  but I’ve always found the first step towards addressing – and perhaps changing –

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Colleges, universities, and globular worming

Aaron Clarey brings his customary wit and sharpness to bear on colleges and universities, and their contribution to (alleged) global warming. The internet has made colleges obsolete. Of course, colleges don’t know that yet.  They and their administrative bloat staff need physical college campuses to continue on otherwise they would have to get real jobs in the real world. . . . Nearly every participant in today’s physical colleges – professors, administrators and the students themselves – have a financial and/or psychological interest in keeping this obsolete horse-and-buggy industry around inspite of the “car of the internet” being developed 20

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On the road today

Miss D. and I are visiting friend and fellow author Alma Boykin today, and speaking to her high school class about Africa and its post-World-War-II history.  She likes them to get a feel for how things really were, rather than the sanitized, skimmed-over pablum served up by their textbook, and pulls in outsiders with experience to discuss such things.  It’s kinda fun. Blogging will be light for most of today, although I’ll try to post later this afternoon, travel permitting.  Meanwhile, please amuse yourselves with the folks in the sidebar. Peter

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Illinois: Talk about a hidden debt bomb!

In the past, I’ve written about the debt incurred by State governments, with particular reference to Illinois.  Now comes news that the “visible” debt in that State may be matched by a similar amount held by school boards – but not listed with other State debts. Illinoisans hear plenty about the state’s ballooning pension debt, its billions in unpaid bills and rising bond debts. In fact, many even know about the local pension crises playing out in cities like Harvey and North Chicago. But most don’t know that the state’s 860 school districts have put Illinoisans on the hook for

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Can’t be fired, eh? Perhaps some other punishment might be found.

Irrespective of her political orientation, anyone who behaves like this should be, at the very least, shunned by all decent people. On Tuesday, a professor at Fresno State made highly outrageous comments celebrating the death of former First Lady of the United States Barbara Bush as she also took delight in the pain that George H.W. Bush is experiencing as a result of his wife’s death. According to her bio page at Fresno State, “Professor Randa Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator” and serves as the “executive director of RAWI, the Radius of Arab American

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What happens when political correctness trumps criminal reality

Here’s a short, but very interesting interview concerning racial classification issues in schools.  I can attest from personal exposure to schools in such environments that the problem is all too real. One hopes the present Administration will do something to sort out this mess . . . but what?  Its hands are too often tied by state and local officials who won’t budge from their politically correct positions. All I can say is, if your child is trapped in a school like that, get him or her out as soon as possible!  If there are no better alternatives, think about

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Arming teachers may not be the easiest or best solution to school shootings

In the wake of the Parkland school shooting, as with other such tragedies, I’m sure you’ve seen calls to arm teachers, so they can protect their students.  I’ve made such calls myself in the past.  However, I’ve been thinking about it, and it may raise as many issues as it might solve. First off, not all schools are equal.  Some are dens of student iniquity – violence, disrespect for the authority of teachers, gang activity, and so on.  New York City is a prime example.  If teachers were armed in such schools, they’d be targeted by the gang-bangers, who’d try

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Oh, the professorial outrage at being objectively measured!

I’m cynically amused by the protests coming from professors at the University of Texas at Austin. The University of Texas at Austin this week became one of the most prestigious research institutions to join a faculty rebellion against Academic Analytics, a data company that promises to identify low-performing professors. UT-Austin’s Faculty Council voted on Monday to approve a resolution recommending that the university make no use of Academic Analytics, especially concerning promotions, tenure, salaries, curriculum, and other faculty issues. As with previous faculty protests of the company at Georgetown and Rutgers Universities, UT-Austin faculty members cited concerns about the accuracy

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Doofus Of The Day #994

Today’s award goes to the authors of a ridiculous article about yoga. A professor of religious studies at Michigan State University recently argued that white people who practice yoga are guilty of enjoying a “system of power, privilege, and oppression.” To truly honor yoga, writes Michigan State University professor Shreena Gandhi, white Americans should understand its history, acknowledge the cultural appropriation they engage in, and possibly reduce the cost of yoga classes for poor people, a group that often includes people of color and “recent immigrants, such as Indian women to whom this practice rightfully belongs.” Gandhi, in an article

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Campus politics and the State of the Union address

Cathy Young, writing in the Boston Herald, has some pithy comments about “How campus politics hijacked American politics“. For some time, a fixation on identity politics, a culture of reflexive outrage, and a scorched-earth approach to trivial transgressions have been all hallmarks of student activism and academic radicalism. They are now becoming increasingly evident in American life as a whole. In the name of defending women and ethnic and sexual minorities — all reasonable goals — progressives on and off campus are taking illiberal stances that polarize society, put a chill on free speech, and erode respect for due process.

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