Cabin pron

I’ve seen posts on several blogs from time to time offering pictures of picturesque cabins in the woods, in the mountains, at the seashore, etc.  I was reminded of them when I found this image on Gab this morning.  Clickit to biggit. Imagine waking up to that view in summer!  It’d be great.  Winter . . . not so much, I guess.  I imagine it’d be really cold up there! Peter

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Mugshot of the week

For the benefit of overseas readers, in the USA a “mugshot” is a common term for the photograph taken of suspects/offenders by police when they’re arrested, as they’re booked into the local jail. This one comes to us courtesy of the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office in Michigan.  More information here. Blue??? Peter

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New York in 1911 – history captured on film

I’m obliged to The Last Tradition for publishing the link to this footage of New York City in 1911, which has been very nicely restored.  For history buffs, it makes fascinating viewing. It’s sobering to think that everyone in those images is dead by now.  I wonder what they would have said if they could have foreseen World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, and so on?  Those storm clouds would not have been even a shadow on the horizon in 1911 . . . I wonder whether, 107 years from now, someone will be viewing video (or

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A military blast from the photographic past

Here’s a fascinating little gizmo.  Click the image for a larger view. It’s a training camera used for machine gun operators during World War II.  It’s for sale on eBay in the UK.  The blurb reads: Up for sale is a very rare, collectible WWII Japanese militaria piece, perfect for vintage camera / military-war time collectors! This is a Konishoruko (which became Konica) Rokuoh-Sha Type 89 “Machine Gun” Military Training Camera. The camera is in overall excellent condition, especially considering it was used during war-time. There’s more at the link. According to DPreview: … these cameras would be mounted in

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30 days at sea, in 10 minutes

YouTube user JeffHK is a navigation officer aboard a container vessel.  He’s posted a very-high-resolution 4K video of a 30-day voyage from the Red Sea to Hong Kong, via Sri Lanka and Singapore.  He used time-lapse photography to condense everything into a mere 10 minutes. That’s a pretty amazing record of a voyage like that.  More, please! Peter

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The great Cottingley Fairies hoax, one hundred years ago

An article in the Telegraph reminded me of the great Cottingley Fairies hoax of 1917.  It fooled a great many people.  Here’s an excerpt. … the house in Main Street was occupied by Arthur and Polly Wright and their only daughter, Elsie. Arthur was an electrical engineer and keen amateur photographer, the proud owner of a Midg quarter-plate camera, an expensive piece of kit for the time. Also living with them, temporarily, were Polly’s sister Annie Griffiths and her daughter Frances, who had made the perilous wartime sea journey from South Africa. By 1917, Elsie was 15 and Frances nine.

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And to think people have to breathe that!

Courtesy of Daily Timewaster, here’s a fascinating video clip showing passing steam trains setting fire to coal dust in the air as they pass a coal mine in China.  The last couple of trains, in the deepest darkness, produce the most spectacular effects.  I highly recommend watching it in full-screen mode. It’s unnerving to think that anywhere from hundreds to thousands of people – workers at the coal mine, those passing on the railway line, and families living in the area – actually breathe that dust every day, just by being nearby.  I wonder what their lungs look like? (On the

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Jupiter, up close and personal

Here’s a fun video:  the sixth flypast of Jupiter by NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which it completed last month.  I don’t know why someone decided to include a creepy soundtrack with the video;  it’s more than compelling enough without it!  Oh, well – you can always mute the volume.  Watch it in full-screen mode for best results. It’s hard to imagine that there are no solid features at all in what we’ve just seen.  Jupiter is a so-called ‘gas giant‘ planet, so its entire surface is just a swirling mass of gas (you should pardon the expression), no matter how solid

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