Yes, I’m a prophet again . . . used car edition

Last year I warned readers about the dangers of unwittingly buying a flood-damaged car, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.  It looks like the problem is still very real.  Old NFO passed the word that the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles has just issued this warning (link is to an Adobe Acrobat file in .PDF format): More than eight months after Hurricane Harvey damaged an estimated 500,000 cars and trucks, Texans are still at risk of unknowingly purchasing flood-damaged vehicles. The Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (TxDMV) is urging Texans to do their research before buying a new or used

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I’d never have thought of living in that . . .

. . . but it’s not a bad idea, when you think about it.  The article dates from 2016, but I’ve just come across it. The recent devastation of Hurricane Matthew was especially hard on the third-world country of Haiti. But even in a hurricane, there are places to see the light amongst the bad. Several Haitians are alive today thanks in no small part to loving people combined with the ingenuity and effort found in agriculture. Sukup Manufacturing has made a name for themselves through high quality grain bins across the United States, but a different kind of product

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It’s a dripping world out there

Tuesday’s “blue norther“, as they call such weather events in northern Texas, left a thick layer of frozen sleet on the ground, and all over local roads.  Driving was very tricky for a while, and most of us stayed firmly at home. Today, things are warming up (well, to freezing point at least, and hopefully a few degrees above that by this afternoon).  Melting ice is dripping from the eaves of the roof, and the road outside is slush rather than ice.  Hopefully driving will be back to normal by tomorrow.  I have to go out later, but I’m hoping

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Brrrr!

Miss D. and I just got back from a chilly (but not unbearably so) Utah, where we attended the LTUE convention over the weekend.  We looked forward to warming up in the more temperate climes we’re used to in Texas . . . but the weather gods had other ideas. Yesterday morning it reached a high of 74 degrees (Fahrenheit, for the benefit of overseas readers) in our area;  then it plummeted by about 40 degrees, over the course of no more than an hour or two.  By last night it was in the low 30’s, and this morning it

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Safely home – still exhausted

Miss D. and I finally made it home about half past midnight this morning.  We had a long flight, delayed by the arrival of a winter storm in Salt Lake City, which delayed our flight while it was de-iced before takeoff.  There was a bit of weather around Dallas, too, requiring incoming flights to “stack up” and delay their landings while controllers talked them down more slowly than usual. The weather on the ground was strange.  Our car was parked in the long-term parking garage, but every car inside it was wet, as if it had rained indoors!  The floors

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Coming in with a bang

It seems this Silk Way Airlines Boeing 747 freighter ran into wind shear at the foot of the runway at Holland’s Schipol Airport back in April.  The result was this very hard landing.  Note the shaking of the wing and its attachments, and the way the plane is tossed onto a different heading by the time it touches down for the second time.  That was a hairy landing, and no mistake! Glad I wasn’t on board . . . Peter

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Rock ‘n roll – air travel edition

There were extremely dangerous wind shear and crosswind conditions at the airport of Salzburg, Austria yesterday.  This flight nearly came a cropper as it touched down, saved only by the quick reactions of the pilots, who took off again at once – and headed back to their airport of origin, rather than try to land again.  I can’t say I blame them! First, how it looked to observers. Next, how it looked from inside the plane.  There’s no sound on this video, so don’t adjust your computer’s volume. Time for everyone aboard to change their underwear, I’d say! Peter

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Am I a prophet, or what? – used car edition

After Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, flooding hundreds of thousands of vehicles in the process, I wrote: [After Hurricane Katrina in 2005] Tens of thousands of Louisiana vehicles were ‘exported’ to other states, and sold there by their owners on the original title, with no mention made of flood damage.  In many cases, owners insisted that they’d evacuated in their vehicles, which had therefore not been flooded at all.  Only after time had passed did the inevitable damage show up . . . and by then the previous owners were long gone. . . . I can only advise my readers

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